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Kickstarter Project Bonds All Available Broadband Connections
Connectify Dispatch Already Surpassed Kickstarter Goals
by Karl Bode 09:04AM Monday Aug 27 2012
A company by the name of Connectify has launched a new Kickstarter project named Connectify Dispatch, which will allow users to bond every and any available connection to deliver the fastest possible speed. If you're in a coffee shop, the software will bond your 3G/4G connection with Wi-Fi to increase speeds. Users can integrate up to ten connections. A few weeks ago the company posted a video showing how they'd connected TEN Wi-Fi, 3G/4G, and Ethernet connections to obtain speeds of 85 Mbps downstream. With ten days to go on their crowd funding effort, the company says they've already surpassed their goal of $50,000.


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battleop

join:2005-09-28
00000

1 recommendation

Their product is based on theft?

Looks like their product is based on stealing Wifi from other users and then bonding it together.
--
I do not, have not, and will not work for AT&T/Comcast/Verizon/Charter or similar sized company.

ropeguru
Premium
join:2001-01-25
Mechanicsville, VA

Re: Their product is based on theft?

said by battleop:

Looks like their product is based on stealing Wifi from other users and then bonding it together.

No, their product is about aggregating bandwidth from multiple sources. They just happened to utilize bandwidth from neighbors with open access points.

battleop

join:2005-09-28
00000

Re: Their product is based on theft?

"They just happened to utilize bandwidth from neighbors with open access points."

A.K.A. Theft.

ropeguru
Premium
join:2001-01-25
Mechanicsville, VA

Re: Their product is based on theft?

said by battleop:

"They just happened to utilize bandwidth from neighbors with open access points."

A.K.A. Theft.

How so? As another just posted, suppose you were in a location with multiple FREE open access points. Then how is it theft?

Their GOAL is not to illegally use open access points. If that is even illegal in today's legal realm. It is to aggregate bandwidth from multiple sources.

From your view on this, I am thinking that you are one of the believers that all torrent downloads are for pirating and should be made illegal.

inteller
Sociopaths always win.

join:2003-12-08
Tulsa, OK

Re: Their product is based on theft?

well let me tell you bub, if I connect to a friends open AP that he named 'linksys' my phone will then auto connect to any future open hotspots named linksys. So my phone is aiding and abetting in theft? That's a pretty weak argument. Spare me any weak analogies too.
--
"WHEN THE LAUGH TRACK STARTS THEN THE FUN STARTS!"

ropeguru
Premium
join:2001-01-25
Mechanicsville, VA

Re: Their product is based on theft?

I think you responded to the wrong post. I am certainly not saying that open AP usage is theft.

battleop

join:2005-09-28
00000
Let me tell you pops,

No, but you would be since you are in control of the phone.

battleop

join:2005-09-28
00000
Their video demonstrated that they were using open access points in their building. They then went to the roof to find more. I don't think a single one of them belonged to Starbucks or McDonalds.

"From your view on this, I am thinking that you are one of the believers that all torrent downloads are for pirating and should be made illegal."

All torrents? No. The vast majority? Without a doubt.
--
I do not, have not, and will not work for AT&T/Comcast/Verizon/Charter or similar sized company.
Angrychair

join:2000-09-20
Jacksonville, FL

1 recommendation

I'm sorry, I must have missed it. Could you go ahead and link us to the court precedent that connecting to an open wifi network is theft?

insomniac84

join:2002-01-03
Schererville, IN
said by battleop:

"They just happened to utilize bandwidth from neighbors with open access points."

A.K.A. Theft.

Really? You are going to send this thread back to 2003?

It is not theft if the people leave the connection unprotected. If you leave your wifi unprotected, you are allowing anyone to use it. That is how the technology works.

If you set even the shittiest security, and a person bypasses it, then it is theft. It is only theft if you set it up so others cannot use it. Remember wifi broadcasts. If you don't set any security, your router is announcing itself to everyone who can hear and tells them that they are allowed to connect.

battleop

join:2005-09-28
00000

Re: Their product is based on theft?

If you leave your garage door up while you are away it's ok if we come borrow a few things since you forgot to setup basic security like closing the door?
--
I do not, have not, and will not work for AT&T/Comcast/Verizon/Charter or similar sized company.

AVD
Respice, Adspice, Prospice
Premium
join:2003-02-06
Onion, NJ
kudos:1

Re: Their product is based on theft?

this topic is as old as this board.
--
--Standard disclaimers apply.--

insomniac84

join:2002-01-03
Schererville, IN
said by battleop:

If you leave your garage door up while you are away it's ok if we come borrow a few things since you forgot to setup basic security like closing the door?

Le sigh.

Your garage door does not announce to your neighbors that they are allowed to enter.

An open garage door is the same as wifi that is not broadcasting SSID. An open garage door with a midget in front using a megaphone telling everyone to come into the garage is equivalent to open wifi with SSID broadcast enabled.

battleop

join:2005-09-28
00000

Re: Their product is based on theft?

"Your garage door does not announce to your neighbors that they are allowed to enter"

Neither does your SSID, unless it says something like "Free Wifi"

An open AP is not not mean you have right to use it. Do you believe you have the right to use your neighbors garden hose to get a drink? Do you think you have a right to use the air hose off his air compressor to inflate your tires? Do you have a right to plug into that extension cord that's near your property line?

Just because it's there unsecured does not mean you have a right to it.

It's petty to try and prosecute for the theft of internet service from an open AP but it is still theft. I
--
I do not, have not, and will not work for AT&T/Comcast/Verizon/Charter or similar sized company.

GabeH
Helpless In The Face Of Your Beauty
Premium
join:2001-04-25
Wilmington, DE
That's an odd comment. How do you define stealing? If I'm in a Starbucks or McDonald's and my 3G/4G (which I pay for) is spotty or poor and I bond to the businesses guest wifi (which is free for customers) to improve my connection, that does not seem like stealing. It would be stealing if I was bonding to somebody's personal hotspot to get more bandwidth, but accessing a hotspot to which I was not invited and was not meant to be public is an independent issue unrelated to this technology. Sorry if I'm misunderstanding your view.

battleop

join:2005-09-28
00000

Re: Their product is based on theft?

It's pretty rare that you are going to be in the middle of a bunch of Free WiFi connections so that you can do what they are advertising.
--
I do not, have not, and will not work for AT&T/Comcast/Verizon/Charter or similar sized company.

insomniac84

join:2002-01-03
Schererville, IN

Re: Their product is based on theft?

This really only benefits people who get multiple wired connections and want to bond them.

AVD
Respice, Adspice, Prospice
Premium
join:2003-02-06
Onion, NJ
kudos:1
said by battleop:

It's pretty rare that you are going to be in the middle of a bunch of Free WiFi connections so that you can do what they are advertising.

not true, not true at all.
--
--Standard disclaimers apply.--

Duramax08
To The Moon
Premium
join:2008-08-03
San Antonio, TX

hmmm, idunno

who REALLY needs to use multiple wifi connections? and you just can't buy the software once, you need to buy a license of 6 months or a year. Its a neat idea but I dont see this going that far.
tmc8080

join:2004-04-24
Brooklyn, NY
Reviews:
·ooma
·Optimum Online
·Verizon FiOS

seems to be hardware based..

most software can't do a good job at bonding internal wifi connections so it would have to go through a multi-link hub of somekind. sounds like a neat little project though.. just imagine getting multiple 20, 50, 100mbit connections (over wired/wifi) in the future and bonding those together.. that's some serious b/w!

besides, why pay for a 300mbit f/t connection, when you can grab 2 or 3 or 10 wifi connections for a free sampling of 300mbits..?

whfsdude
Premium
join:2003-04-05
Washington, DC
Reviews:
·Comcast

Just a VPN

This is just a VPN that makes a connection over each connected link. i fail to see what is so special about this software.

One thing to note is that if you have one connection taking packet loss (your typical coffee shop connection around here) or that is high latency, it will degrade your entire connection.
silbaco
Premium
join:2009-08-03
USA

Already exists.

Technology to bond multiple connections already exists. It's not cheap and it has proven to work rather ineffectively. If a several thousand dollar commercial device can't work effectively, why would software like this work any better?
tom thomas

join:2010-11-04

Re: Already exists.

this has certainly been around for a while

»www.mushroomnetworks.com/home.aspx

they started out targeting the same people conectify is but quickly evolved into an 'enterprise' offering.
tom thomas

join:2010-11-04

does this involve a server?

does everything get reconnected/recombined on a server someplace?

if so connectify is going to need an awful lot of bandwidth capacity on the servers, especially since i suspect the interested users will be very heavy ones.

if not how does this work?

ropeguru
Premium
join:2001-01-25
Mechanicsville, VA

Re: does this involve a server?

said by tom thomas:

does everything get reconnected/recombined on a server someplace?

if so connectify is going to need an awful lot of bandwidth capacity on the servers, especially since i suspect the interested users will be very heavy ones.

if not how does this work?

That is what I want to know. Does it aggregate the bandwidth locally or all back to a Connectify server.

Also, I see they keep talking about downloading "files" when they show bandwidth usage. Typical local bonding can also be used in this way to aggregate bandwidth. However, the key here is multiple files or streams to different servers.

Wonder what they would get from a speed test site with a single data stream.
bemis

join:2008-07-18
Reading, MA

Gigabit here I come!

I'm going to get a 12-port USB hub and a bunch of 802.11n dongles... I can bond the Wifi down at Starbucks and get a gigabit connection!

BBBanditRuR
Dingbits

join:2009-06-02
Parachute, CO
Reviews:
·Comcast

Same as the Slurpr

...and with the murky legal issues surrounding it too.

»www.engadget.com/2007/05/29/the-···nd-jail/
elefante72

join:2010-12-03
East Amherst, NY

A good idea

This is on the surface link aggregation. If you are in a densely populated area this may be useful because you can aggregate links to balance the network traffic between different access points IN ADDITION to your primary connection mechanism which is probably HSI or cellular.

I see this as the neuter to caps, because there is no reason you can't assign a bias or app to a float ag group over time. So take for instance, run youtube over free wifi only at best effort (not gobbling your 100 MB of cellular data). If the wifi can't support, don't run it. If it does, stream baby stream. The killer data app right now is video, period. Music can take a good chunk, but man if you can stream that on the train over wifi, bonus. Over time cloud apps are going to supplement what we see today, and that will be bandwidth intensive to (cloudon for example).

For those who are enterprising, one can bond wifi links in a neighborhood to share HSI links to get around caps. That being said there are TOS violations and other "who pays" if it goes over to worry about. I don't see this as the primary mission...It will be cell, LOS/wifi mixing.

Also there is going to be a long transition period between today wifi logins and "automatic" wifi. In a hotel I may see 10 of different access points, no reason I can't load share across them if one joker is streaming on floor 12 and floor 11 and 10 are idle.

Make no mistake this is the way cellcos are going to go down the road anyways, of course they will probably charge you for wifi/cellular also, but it can seamlessly offload at the same time, so they can put up less towers and pass the savings over to us NOT...I mean the shareholders.

NickD
Premium
join:2000-11-17
Princeton Junction, NJ

Re: A good idea

I'd like to see bonding of all available 3G/4G connections. Combine the coverage areas and speeds of AT&T, Verizon, and Sprint. I'd rather pay $20 a month to each of the 3 carriers than $60 a month to one.
elray

join:2000-12-16
Santa Monica, CA
Reviews:
·Time Warner Cable
·EarthLink

Because We Can?

Great. Yet another opportunity for the data hogs and saturators to consume as much as possible, at the expense of everyone else.

If this takes off, WiFi will be come much less usable than it already isn't, and new protocols will be demanded to throttle this type of abuse.

marigolds
Gainfully employed, finally
Premium,MVM
join:2002-05-13
Saint Louis, MO
kudos:2

So you find 10 neighbors...

So you find 10 neighbors with open wifi hotspots, and you bond them altogether....
Problem is, all those neighbors are just connecting to the same node where you are already sharing bandwidth with all 10 of them at the exact same priority anyway. And now rather than just absorbing the latency on your connection, you have the aggregate latency of all 10 connections.
Net result? Unless you are already hitting your speed cap, you get a negligible boost in speed in exchange for a big increase in latency.
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Anonymous_
Anonymous
Premium
join:2004-06-21
127.0.0.1
kudos:2
Reviews:
·Time Warner Cable

Re: So you find 10 neighbors...

said by marigolds:

So you find 10 neighbors with open wifi hotspots, and you bond them altogether....
Problem is, all those neighbors are just connecting to the same node where you are already sharing bandwidth with all 10 of them at the exact same priority anyway. And now rather than just absorbing the latency on your connection, you have the aggregate latency of all 10 connections.
Net result? Unless you are already hitting your speed cap, you get a negligible boost in speed in exchange for a big increase in latency.

Not a issue if they have DOCSIS 3.0

5 40mbps connections can yield all of the bandwidth on the DOCSIS 3.0

more then likely it would RED flag the account due to excessive usage if they guy were to continually max these connections out
talz13

join:2006-03-15
Avon, OH

Re: So you find 10 neighbors...

But wouldn't it be maxing out 5 separate connections? Why would they red flag that?
maikii

join:2012-08-08
Pacific Palisades, CA

Interesting

Ha Ha.

I don't know that it is legally theft, as some say here, but could create some problems.

People who have that would look for any available connection, to add to their own bandwidth.

Not many private users these days have unsecured connections, as there were more years ago. A few do. It is not usually because they want to share their bandwidth with their neighbors though, but usually because they don't know better. (An interesting question then to the theft vs non-theft might be--if someone doesn't know how to lock their home, is it legal/ethical to walk in and steal from them?) (Of course, connecting to a neighbor's internet connection is not nearly a crime to the same level as walking in their home and stealing things from them, just looking theoretically.)

What if ten neighbors mutually agreed to leave their networks unsecured (or give each other their passwords), so that all could connect to all ten, and multiply their bandwidth by ten? Somehow I think they would cancel each other out.

It might greatly increase usage of cellular 3G/4G, as users use it at home to augment the bandwidth of their home broadband, especially for those still with unlimited wireless data. (However, if that started happening, unlimited wireless data might soon no longer exist.)
staregazer

join:2006-12-15
Reviews:
·Frontier Communi..

Re: Interesting

It would not necessarily cancel each other out. ISP's generally buy enough bandwidth to serve about 10-20% of their customer base at any given time. They do so knowing that everybody will not be online at the same time and on top of that, not downloading data at the same time. 3 or 4 out of the 10 people that may want to "bond" may be online at the same time and only half of them may be using bandwidth at the very same time. Worst case scenario they get the same speed as before if everybody is hammering the connection at the same time.