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M-Lab Data: U.S. ISPs Throttle Less, Canadian ISPs Throttle More
Rogers Continues to be the Worst Offender in North America
by Karl Bode 09:32AM Friday Aug 10 2012
While the 2007 Comcast traffic shaping fiasco has resulted in fewer U.S. ISPs throttling BitTorrent traffic, Canadian ISPs continue to throttle BitTorrent connections (legitimate or otherwise) happily, according to the latest data from M Labs. In the United States, throttling among ISPs has taken a sharp dive since 2010 when ISPs throttled 50%; tests now show only 3% of Comcast BitTorrent connections are throttled, with Cox the worst offender at around 6%. In the UK throttling is heading the opposite direction, with incumbent British Telecom now throttling 67% of all BitTorrent transfers. In Canada most ISPs continue to throttle with Rogers continuing to be the worst at 80% -- despite promising throttling was going away. You can check the full data and look for your ISP here.

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ArrayList
netbus developer
Premium
join:2005-03-19
Brighton, MA

Throttling in the U.S.

I thought US ISPs couldn't throttle beyond the max speed subscribed.
34764170

join:2007-09-06
Etobicoke, ON

Re: Throttling in the U.S.

said by ArrayList:

I thought US ISPs couldn't throttle beyond the max speed subscribed.

What you said doesn't even make sense.

ArrayList
netbus developer
Premium
join:2005-03-19
Brighton, MA

Re: Throttling in the U.S.

you pay for X mbps, they cannot throttle you below that. sorry for the wording.

AVD
Respice, Adspice, Prospice
Premium
join:2003-02-06
Onion, NJ
kudos:1

Re: Throttling in the U.S.

read your tos. You subscribe for speeds "up to". there is no minimum speeds. The ToS also gives them rights to manage their network.
--
--Standard disclaimers apply.--
The preceding posting is null and void in Arizona and any other jurisdiction where prohibited by law.

ArrayList
netbus developer
Premium
join:2005-03-19
Brighton, MA

Re: Throttling in the U.S.

Just read my TOS, nothing in there like what you are talking about.
34764170

join:2007-09-06
Etobicoke, ON

Re: Throttling in the U.S.

said by ArrayList:

Just read my TOS, nothing in there like what you are talking about.

It's in there.

ArrayList
netbus developer
Premium
join:2005-03-19
Brighton, MA

Re: Throttling in the U.S.

it most definitely is not in there. but then again I don't have a residential connection.

AVD
Respice, Adspice, Prospice
Premium
join:2003-02-06
Onion, NJ
kudos:1

Re: Throttling in the U.S.

said by ArrayList:

it most definitely is not in there. but then again I don't have a residential connection.

unless you own the ISP, it is in there. Can you post a link to your ISP's ToS?
--
--Standard disclaimers apply.--
The preceding posting is null and void in Arizona and any other jurisdiction where prohibited by law.
Crookshanks

join:2008-02-04
Binghamton, NY

Re: Throttling in the U.S.

Here is Frontier's residential and business TOS. Additionally here is a page they have on network management. There's nothing in any of these pages about throttling. They do say that they reserve the right to ask you to upgrade to higher tiers of service if you exceed the limits (they don't currently have any, to the best of my knowledge) of your current tier. Two interesting points from the network management page:

As a result of explosive growth of the Internet and the availability of ever more sophisticated applications, per subscriber bandwidth consumption has dramatically increased. This causes periodic congestion in the network that Frontier must address. Generally, Frontier utilizes a best-efforts approach to deliver residential High Speed Internet service. This means Frontier does not prioritize one type of traffic (e.g. video) over other types (e.g. data). Frontier seeks to deliver all traffic at the speed the customer has purchased (e.g. 1/3/6 Mbps download speeds); network management is content and application agnostic.

Frontier uses network management tools to enforce quality of service to business customers for applications that are sensitive to packet loss, delay or jitter like VoIP, time sensitive data, and video traffic.


AVD
Respice, Adspice, Prospice
Premium
join:2003-02-06
Onion, NJ
kudos:1

Re: Throttling in the U.S.

said by Crookshanks:

Here is Frontier's residential and business TOS. Additionally here is a page they have on network management. There's nothing in any of these pages about throttling. They do say that they reserve the right to ask you to upgrade to higher tiers of service if you exceed the limits (they don't currently have any, to the best of my knowledge) of your current tier. Two interesting points from the network management page:

As a result of explosive growth of the Internet and the availability of ever more sophisticated applications, per subscriber bandwidth consumption has dramatically increased. This causes periodic congestion in the network that Frontier must address. Generally, Frontier utilizes a best-efforts approach to deliver residential High Speed Internet service. This means Frontier does not prioritize one type of traffic (e.g. video) over other types (e.g. data). Frontier seeks to deliver all traffic at the speed the customer has purchased (e.g. 1/3/6 Mbps download speeds); network management is content and application agnostic.

Frontier uses network management tools to enforce quality of service to business customers for applications that are sensitive to packet loss, delay or jitter like VoIP, time sensitive data, and video traffic.

You bolded the wrong thing
--
--Standard disclaimers apply.--
The preceding posting is null and void in Arizona and any other jurisdiction where prohibited by law.
34764170

join:2007-09-06
Etobicoke, ON
said by ArrayList:

you pay for X mbps, they cannot throttle you below that. sorry for the wording.

And that doesn't make any sense. What would be the point of throttling if that were the case?

ArrayList
netbus developer
Premium
join:2005-03-19
Brighton, MA

Re: Throttling in the U.S.

what is the point of throttling?
34764170

join:2007-09-06
Etobicoke, ON

Re: Throttling in the U.S.

said by ArrayList:

what is the point of throttling?

It is typically used as a means to try and reduce the amount of traffic from certain protocols or to certain sites through their network to overcome the lack of appropriate upgrades to their network to be able to handle the load at peak hours. This is especially an issue with cable networks but is also an issue with older DSL networks with ATM links to the DSLAMs.

Throttlin

@teksavvy.com
FBGuy, this is not that type of throttling. The throttling discussed in this article is the kind that applies to specific types of internet traffic. For example, Rogers purposely slows down bit torrent traffic because bit torrent traffic inadvertently destroys kittens (at least I think that is Roger's position).

Oh_No
Trogglus normalus

join:2011-05-21
Chicago, IL
said by 34764170:

said by ArrayList:

I thought US ISPs couldn't throttle beyond the max speed subscribed.

What you said doesn't even make sense.

Technically, what he says makes perfect sense.
Your connection could support 100mbps, but if you buy 30 mbps then that is all you will get.
He could of said it differently to be clearer.
34764170

join:2007-09-06
Etobicoke, ON

Re: Throttling in the U.S.

said by Oh_No:

Technically, what he says makes perfect sense.
Your connection could support 100mbps, but if you buy 30 mbps then that is all you will get.

That has nothing to do with the topic of throttling.

El Quintron
Resident Mouth Breather
Premium
join:2008-04-28
Etobicoke, ON
kudos:4
Reviews:
·TekSavvy Cable
·TekSavvy DSL

No Surprises about Rogers

Due to their "not-a-former-monopoly" status, they benefit from less scrutiny than our other evil overlords, Bell.

More pressure needs to be applied I guess, I'm just glad I'm not a client of theirs in any fashion.
--
Support Bacteria -- It's the Only Culture Some People Have
tmc8080

join:2004-04-24
Brooklyn, NY
Reviews:
·ooma
·Optimum Online
·Verizon FiOS

more oft' than not..

only oversold cablemodem nodes (ie not enough bandwidth to serve the customer base on the node at their speed tiers, either up or down) or a wireless data plan that throttles speeds down based on usage and cell node managment.. typically a cellular node throttling scheme is more severe and has specific data consumption targets that enable throttling similar to satellite based broadband.

with regards to wireless throttling fairness? I don't think it's a good value based on the current pricing structure & terms of service to buy a wireless data plan (even if they didn't throttle) from a cellular carrier. the only plan for wireless data is to rip you off...
kevinds
Premium
join:2003-05-01
Calgary, AB
kudos:3
Reviews:
·Shaw

Throttling

Except Rogers throttles everything (or was), all the time, not only during peak-times, and regardless of usage over a large area. If a bit-torrent application was in use, your connection speed (for everything) was slowed to something like 80kbps, and continued for some time after shutting it down - I have to do some searching to find my source on that.

There are bigger ISPs in Canada than Rogers who are not pricks about throttling connections, but Rogers I believe is the worst, and I have my opinion on which company is 2nd worst.
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Yes, I am not employed and looking for IT work. Have passport, will travel.
OCP
Premium
join:2004-10-11
USA

North America?

Are we ignoring Mexico, Greenland, Belize, Cuba, etc?