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Mean Data Usage Rises 120% in a Year
Netflix Accounts for 33% of Peak Internet Traffic
by Karl Bode 06:29PM Monday Nov 12 2012
According to the latest data from Sandvine, the mean monthly Internet data usage on North America fixed-line networks has shot up 120% in the past year, from 23 gigabytes (GB) to 51 GB. That's really nothing compared to Asia, where the mean monthly usage is now 659 MB, up 10% in the last six months. Contrary to theories put forward by companies pushing the Exaflood theory, the Internet has yet to collapse from this load, nor have we been subjected to the Internet brownouts you might recall some predicted.

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Still, that's a hell of a lot of data. "Audio and video streaming account for 65% of all downstream traffic from 9pm-12am and half of that is Netflix traffic [on North America fixed networks]. Prioritizing real-time applications like live audio and video is critical to maintaining a high quality of experience," said Sandvine CEO Dave Caputo (read: Internet growth is scary, please buy our hardware).

Other bits of interesting information from the report:

•In Europe, YouTube represents more than 20% of peak period downstream traffic on mobile networks

•Netflix dominates North American fixed networks accounting for 33% of peak period downstream traffic

•Other video services on North American fixed networks include Amazon (1.8% of peak period downstream traffic), Hulu (1.4%) and HBO Go (0.5%)

•BitTorrent continues to decline in application-share, accounting for 16% of total traffic in Europe and is slightly smaller in North America, accounting for 12%

•In Asia-Pacific, where there are fewer paid over-the-top video services available, BitTorrent accounts for 36% of total traffic

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88615298
Premium
join:2004-07-28
West Tenness

So ISPs answer this

are you still claiming only 2% use more than what your caps are? Because I'm pretty sure when you first started saying that the mean usage was around 5 GB a month.

umok

@verizon.net

Re: So ISPs answer this

Math still works. The CAPs were set so high from early on that even with more usage it is still probably a select few that are 100x the average user

espaeth
Digital Plumber
Premium,MVM
join:2001-04-21
Minneapolis, MN
kudos:2
Reviews:
·Vitelity VOIP

1 edit
said by 88615298:

are you still claiming only 2% use more than what your caps are? Because I'm pretty sure when you first started saying that the mean usage was around 5 GB a month.

No, the MEDIAN usage was around that. (actually in 2008 it was reported as 2-3GB/mo)

The top 10% of broadband subscribers still represent 90% of the total volume.

From the report:
said by Sandvine Report :

Since our last study, North American fixed access networks have seen a significant increase in per-subscriber usage.
Mean monthly usage has increased by almost 20 GB, rising from 32.1 GB to 51.3 GB in the past six months, while median usage increased at a similar pace jumping from 10.3 GB to 16.8 GB.

...

In North America, the top 1% of subscribers who make the heaviest use of the network’s upstream resources account for 38.6% of total upstream traffic. The comparable downstream users account for 12.8% of downstream bytes. At the opposite end of the usage spectrum, the network’s lightest 50% of users account for only 5.2 % of total monthly traffic.

Bob61571

join:2008-08-08
Washington, IL

Big reason we cancelled Netflix streaming for DVD only was

our slow speed (3Mbps) and bad streaming selection.
clocks11

join:2002-05-06
00000

1 recommendation

Asia numbers

For Asia, is that MB or supposed to be GB?

espaeth
Digital Plumber
Premium,MVM
join:2001-04-21
Minneapolis, MN
kudos:2
Reviews:
·Vitelity VOIP

Re: Asia numbers

said by clocks11:

For Asia, is that MB or supposed to be GB?

It's MB -- the stat is average mobile usage in Asia.

DataRiker
Premium
join:2002-05-19
00000

1 edit

Re: Asia numbers

open wifi is ubiquitous in South Korea, so no real for massive cellular data. I'm not so sure of other countries in east Asia.

When I was there my phone was almost always connected to free wifi.

battleop

join:2005-09-28
00000

Netflix consumes 33% of Peak Internet Traffic?

I'm going to call Bullshit, or at least on the headline.

I don't believe that Neflix consumes 33% of all internet traffic as this may suggest. I would believe that it consumes 33% of residential traffic headed to networks that are heavily dominated by residential users.
--
I do not, have not, and will not work for AT&T/Comcast/Verizon/Charter or similar sized company.
elefante72

join:2010-12-03
East Amherst, NY

Re: Netflix consumes 33% of Peak Internet Traffic?

This is real BS, because in most cases Netflix isn't crossing the "internet" at all (except for catalog refresh), it's being hosted in CDN's somewhere in the carriers intranet.

This is why they are apes**t about P2P because that actually costs them transit fees, and so does tunneling. So the more the content companies crack down, the higher the transit fees.

Netflix/streaming is glory to them because they can host that in-network and charge users for caps. A win win.

In any case Sandvine is a company that creates products to measure and bill for carriers, so they are no friend of mine. Of course they have a vested interest to find out ways to charge end users for bytes, even though that has very little to do with cost. The "internet is exploding" is crap, because it is not. These things for mobile are always shoddy, because in many cases these studies take into account wifi usage also. While it's usage it doesn't go against your cap (if you have one).
TheGuvnor9

join:2006-06-23
Beverly Hills, CA

Re: Netflix consumes 33% of Peak Internet Traffic?

Right, because both have nifty little measurement devices that track the entire interwebs....

damonlab
Premium
join:2001-05-02
Detroit, MI
said by elefante72:

This is real BS, because in most cases Netflix isn't crossing the "internet" at all (except for catalog refresh), it's being hosted in CDN's somewhere in the carriers intranet.

This is why they are apes**t about P2P because that actually costs them transit fees, and so does tunneling. So the more the content companies crack down, the higher the transit fees.

Netflix/streaming is glory to them because they can host that in-network and charge users for caps. A win win.

ISPs claim to want in-network traffic, yet they killed newsgroups.

skuv

@rr.com
Two of the largest residential ISP's, Comcast and TWC, do not have Netflix CDN's on their network. Do you forget Comcast's big fight with Level(3), one of Netflix's CDN hosts, from a couple of years ago?

And it still counts as Internet traffic, even it did. It is still getting to the end user which is connected to the Internet.
axus

join:2001-06-18
Washington, DC
Sandvine was behind the TCP/IP-breaking shenanigans that Comcast was using on Bittorrent a few years ago.
lemonade

join:2003-12-13
Los Angeles, CA
I think so too, 33% sounds like a lot... but without seeing their methodology, there's no way to know if the number is right...

battleop

join:2005-09-28
00000

Re: Netflix consumes 33% of Peak Internet Traffic?

If anything the head line should say something like 33% of Sandvine customers......
rradina

join:2000-08-08
Chesterfield, MO
The key could be "peak" traffic and how it's defined.

Regarding NetFlix, I thought they used someones edge caching service which means those video streams should be reasonably close to subscribers and not choking big distances on the Internet.

I have a router that tracks my usage. I'm right around 100GB/month. Sometimes less, sometimes more. Maybe a couple times a month, an Apple TV Movie is rented but the balance is surfing, Skype and gaming.

I have three boys who are avid gamers (Steam/Minecraft). When they don't game for a day because of other activities, the daily usage is below 1GB. Sometimes as little as 500MB. However, when they do game, Skype and what not, it's several GB/day and sometimes up to 10GB/day. Just this past week end it rained all day Sunday and they had a marathon day. One day consumed 9.4GB!

This is why CAPs are a rather imperfect means of classifying and penalizing "heavy users". Their game traffic is very light but it's constant. I never have slow Internet when they game and likewise, it can't be stressful for the ISP -- especially when many of the people they play are on the same cable system.
BiggA

join:2005-11-23
EARTH
They may be looking at prime time when most people are at home, and most businesses aren't moving data around. It may also not count VPN connections and other "private" traffic.

N3OGH
Yo Soy Col. "Bat" Guano
Premium
join:2003-11-11
Philly burbs
kudos:2

Here comes the Exaflood

Not.

All providers cry the sky is falling when their dumb pipes aren't making the bucks.

Even AT&T stopped crying bandwidth crisis (posted here on this site) when it no longer suited them.

Just like everything else in this country anymore, it's all a manipulation. Everything you see in the media, everything coming from the corporate world, the government, the body politic in general, talk radio & the web is just an effort to gin people up for a particular cause so the gin-err can make a buck off the actions of the gin-ee.

Cynical? For sure. Accurate? Bet your ass....
--
Petty people are disproportionally corrupted by petty power

JamesJohnstn

@leaseweb.com

What does tunneling mean?

What does the category in this chart "tunneling" mean?

cdru
Go Colts
Premium,MVM
join:2003-05-14
Fort Wayne, IN
kudos:7

Re: What does tunneling mean?

said by JamesJohnstn :

What does the category in this chart "tunneling" mean?

Most likely VPN tunneling, largely for P2P masking the users real IP. Also use to make yourself appear in a different location for geolocation purposes. Some streaming services require you to be in a particular country to use them, or to not be in a country.

NickD
Premium
join:2000-11-17
Princeton Junction, NJ
Reviews:
·Comcast

Re: What does tunneling mean?

said by cdru:

said by JamesJohnstn :

What does the category in this chart "tunneling" mean?

Most likely VPN tunneling, largely for P2P masking the users real IP. Also use to make yourself appear in a different location for geolocation purposes. Some streaming services require you to be in a particular country to use them, or to not be in a country.

Or it could be people working that need to use a VPN to connect to a corporate network.

cdru
Go Colts
Premium,MVM
join:2003-05-14
Fort Wayne, IN
kudos:7

Re: What does tunneling mean?

said by NickD:

Or it could be people working that need to use a VPN to connect to a corporate network.

Yeah. Uh huh. I bet that's what makes up most of that percentage.
34764170

join:2007-09-06
Etobicoke, ON

bogus caps

and they just keep proving that caps are bogus and the BS they spew is no justification for them being used.
elray

join:2000-12-16
Santa Monica, CA
Reviews:
·Time Warner Cable
·EarthLink

Re: bogus caps

said by 34764170:

and they just keep proving that caps are bogus and the BS they spew is no justification for them being used.

Wired caps don't affect 98% of us, and there are capless tiers for guys like you. What's the problem?
34764170

join:2007-09-06
Etobicoke, ON

Re: bogus caps

Be gone clueless.
elray

join:2000-12-16
Santa Monica, CA

Re: bogus caps

said by 34764170:

Be gone clueless.

In other words, you have no reason to complain.

Omega
Displaced Ohioan
Premium
join:2002-07-30
Somerset, NJ

Article usage stats

Karl,

Why did you measure American usage in GB/year while measuring Asian usage as MB/month? While one can do the math, it does not present a good immediate comparison that a usage article should.
--
What smells like blue?