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New RIAA Plan 'Just A Scarecrow'
All for show, to scare off P2P users...
by Karl Bode 11:22AM Thursday Dec 24 2009
Remember about a year ago, when the RIAA leaked word to the Wall Street Journal that they were replacing their misguided tactic of suing grandmothers and college students with a new anti-piracy system? That system involved ISPs, who would implement piracy filters and voluntarily boot heavy P2P users from the network. Of course as 2009 progressed the ISPs made it clear they wanted nothing to do with the RIAA's system, and a year later the program -- which supposedly already had companies like AT&T and Comcast on board -- is nowhere to be found. CNET takes a look at what happened to the plan:
quote:
Multiple music sources have told me over the past month the RIAA leaders were feeling pressure to drop the lawsuit campaign, but were also being lobbied by some at the labels to put some kind of deterrent in place, even if totally toothless. They didn't want the public to think there weren't any consequences to pirating music, even if the reality was exactly that. According to those sources, the announcement about the ISP strategy last December was little more than a scarecrow.
That's not to say that ISPs haven't ramped up the number of warnings they've sent users to keep the entertainment industry and lawmakers at bay, but those warnings remain largely toothless. Only one ISP we know of (Cox Communications) admits to actually booting repeat offenders from the network, and Cox tells us they only wind up booting a tiny fraction of their customer base -- after giving them countless warnings to scale back their P2P usage.

This won't make a dent in piracy, so it still only seems like a matter of time before Uncle Sam is convinced by his Hollywood friends to pass a law forcing ISPs to boot users and implement filters. We're curious: how many "Notice of Claim of Copyright Infringements" have you received from your ISPs? Have you ignored them? Has there been consequences for ignoring them?

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Harddrive
Proud American and Infidel since 1968.
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join:2000-09-20
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1 recommendation

Just face the facts...

in the digital age, there will always be piracy of digital media. its just too easy to get it free.
--
I've come here to chew bubblegum and kick ass and i'm all outta bubblegum.

FFH5
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Tavistock NJ
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Re: Just face the facts...

said by Harddrive:

in the digital age, there will always be piracy of digital media. its just too easy to get it free.
The real tragedy here is that parents, through their words and actions, tell their children that it is ok to steal, cheat, & lie - just don't get caught. And that is why policies to enforce morality aren't working. We have a generation of people who have been taught that anything goes; morals are relative; and if caught hire a good lawyer to get out of it.
--
My BLOG .. .. Internet News .. .. My Web Page


Harddrive
Proud American and Infidel since 1968.
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DFW
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1 recommendation

Re: Just face the facts...

no, i think its politicians and big business that tell people 'that it is ok to steal, cheat, & lie - just don't get caught.'
--
I've come here to chew bubblegum and kick ass and i'm all outta bubblegum.
nasadude

join:2001-10-05
Rockville, MD
Reviews:
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Re: Just face the facts...

said by Harddrive:

no, i think its politicians and big business that tell people 'that it is ok to steal, cheat, & lie - just don't get caught.'
damn, you beat me to it. Accountability and taking responsibility for ones actions no longer exists in America.
Desdinova
Premium
join:2003-01-26
Gaithersburg, MD

Re: Just face the facts...

I agree, I was going to say that I learned from the Nixon Bunch about "no accountability", "plausible deniability", and the "non-denial denial" all of which are (and probably always have been) part of Business As Usual in politics and big business, the two (primary) institutions who try and prevent non-members from doing the same thing.
viperlmw
Premium
join:2005-01-25
said by FFH5:

said by Harddrive:

in the digital age, there will always be piracy of digital media. its just too easy to get it free.
The real tragedy here is that parents, through their words and actions, tell their children that it is ok to steal, cheat, & lie - just don't get caught. And that is why policies to enforce morality aren't working. We have a generation of people who have been taught that anything goes; morals are relative; and if caught hire a good lawyer to get out of it.
Speak for yourself.

FFH5
Premium
join:2002-03-03
Tavistock NJ
kudos:5

Re: Just face the facts...

said by viperlmw:

said by FFH5:

said by Harddrive:

in the digital age, there will always be piracy of digital media. its just too easy to get it free.
The real tragedy here is that parents, through their words and actions, tell their children that it is ok to steal, cheat, & lie - just don't get caught. And that is why policies to enforce morality aren't working. We have a generation of people who have been taught that anything goes; morals are relative; and if caught hire a good lawyer to get out of it.
Speak for yourself.
I always do. Who else would I speak for?
--
My BLOG .. .. Internet News .. .. My Web Page

jauman

join:2001-12-06
Kent, WA

2 recommendations

Re: Just face the facts...

You presume to speak for all parents. Your statement of "parents, through their words and actions, tell their children that it is ok to steal, cheat, & lie - just don't get caught" asserts all parents DO condone it. Your broad statement is *far* from the truth.

In our capitalist society where theft writ large occurs by corporate leaders and there are anti-consumer actions that borderline on criminal (most-recent example being Verizon's $1.99 mystery data fee), is it really then surprising that small scale theft flourishes?
viperlmw
Premium
join:2005-01-25
said by viperlmw:

said by FFH5:

said by Harddrive:

in the digital age, there will always be piracy of digital media. its just too easy to get it free.
The real tragedy here is that parents, through their words and actions, tell their children that it is ok to steal, cheat, & lie - just don't get caught. And that is why policies to enforce morality aren't working. We have a generation of people who have been taught that anything goes; morals are relative; and if caught hire a good lawyer to get out of it.
Speak for yourself.
said by FFH5:

I always do. Who else would I speak for?
"The real tragedy here is that I, through MY words and actions, tell MY children that it is ok to steal, cheat, & lie - just don't get caught. And that is why policies to enforce morality aren't working. I have a generation of people who have been taught that anything goes; morals are relative; and if caught hire a good lawyer to get out of it."

Then I fixed it for you!

Get real

@mchsi.com
Your perspective would hold water if the RIAA and record companies weren't using lawyers to protect their right to trowel out poptart sludge no one wants to buy while paying the artists a pittance so they can pay their CEOs 6 and 7 figure incomes.

I read their latest tactic is to charge a fee for the short demos of songs on iTunes; I should pay to find out if their songs are worth paying for? F A I L !

Maybe some day they'll wake up and realize that if they want better sales they need better music, movies and games to sell. When you market product to the lowest common denominator of the market you get lowest common denominator sales and prices.

karlmarx

join:2006-09-18
Chicago, IL
So, in other words, our children have been taught to act like corporations! Wow, there's a winning strategy.
--
Remember 1 in 4 people are retarded. 25% of Americans are Republican. Coincidence? I don't think so.

badtrip
I heart the East Bay
Premium
join:2004-03-20
Albany, CA
said by FFH5:

The real tragedy here is that parents, through their words and actions, tell their children that it is ok to steal, cheat, & lie - just don't get caught. And that is why policies to enforce morality aren't working. We have a generation of people who have been taught that anything goes; morals are relative; and if caught hire a good lawyer to get out of it.
This statement is so full of shit that you must have held your breath while typing it. Downloading media is not lying, cheating or stealing -- it's downloading media. At best it's fair use/non-issue (for open works) and at worst it's copyright infringement.

Further, morality is highly relative. What you may say is immoral, I may say is benign or even fun.

The problem is not morality or ethics, the problem is content providers forgot about the law of supply and demand. They were so busy manufacturing false shortages and charging exorbitant prices for their shitty content, that when the dam broke and supply skyrocketed they cried and shook their fists at their "customers" instead of adapting.

Dinosuars will die.

doc69
Premium
join:2004-08-01
said by FFH5:

said by Harddrive:

in the digital age, there will always be piracy of digital media. its just too easy to get it free.
The real tragedy here is that parents, through their words and actions, tell their children that it is ok to steal, cheat, & lie - just don't get caught. And that is why policies to enforce morality aren't working. We have a generation of people who have been taught that anything goes; morals are relative; and if caught hire a good lawyer to get out of it.
Are you kidding me? With all the lying & stealing bullshit this government & big business do on a daily basis out in the open to everybody & get away with, your gonna sit there & blame the parents? Talk about being mislead!! You need to try some different koolaid. I'm not defending all but you sure did make one big blanket statement there bud!
--
I'll keep my God, my freedom, my guns, and my money. You can keep "THE CHANGE."

str8_Krazy

@sbcglobal.net

1 recommendation

Re: Just face the facts...

said by doc69:

said by FFH5:

said by Harddrive:

in the digital age, there will always be piracy of digital media. its just too easy to get it free.
The real tragedy here is that parents, through their words and actions, tell their children that it is ok to steal, cheat, & lie - just don't get caught. And that is why policies to enforce morality aren't working. We have a generation of people who have been taught that anything goes; morals are relative; and if caught hire a good lawyer to get out of it.
Are you kidding me? With all the lying & stealing bullshit this government & big business do on a daily basis out in the open to everybody & get away with, your gonna sit there & blame the parents? Talk about being mislead!! You need to try some different koolaid. I'm not defending all but you sure did make one big blanket statement there bud!
I don't know how it is where you live but last time I looked parents of children RUN those corporations and stand up and lie for them in front of congress and on national TV

TKJunkMail
Premium
join:2005-12-09
said by FFH5:

said by Harddrive:

in the digital age, there will always be piracy of digital media. its just too easy to get it free.
The real tragedy here is that parents, through their words and actions, tell their children that it is ok to steal, cheat, & lie - just don't get caught. And that is why policies to enforce morality aren't working. We have a generation of people who have been taught that anything goes; morals are relative; and if caught hire a good lawyer to get out of it.
Sounds exactly like the corporations and their tame Republicrats that got us into the current financial mess.

Augustus III
If Only Rome Could See Us Now....

join:2001-01-25
Gainesville, GA
said by FFH5:

said by Harddrive:

in the digital age, there will always be piracy of digital media. its just too easy to get it free.
The real tragedy here is that parents, through their words and actions, tell their children that it is ok to steal, cheat, & lie - just don't get caught. And that is why policies to enforce morality aren't working. We have a generation of people who have been taught that anything goes; morals are relative; and if caught hire a good lawyer to get out of it.
Oh boy. "stealing" something you never would buy anyway... the gateway "crime" to felony bank robbery, aggravated robbery and drug trafficking.

Holy crap!!!!!!!!!!!!!! We are doomed!! The next generation of hard core criminals is already walking among you. Hurry, get off the planet; it doesnt comply to your will.

I thought you were the anything goes generation? You know.. get high at woodstock and have unprotected adventure with underage strangers at the hippy bus stop.

What has the world come to when druggies are allowed to breed! Then blame their peers..

johnmc963

@verizon.net

1 edit
Why the fuck should their be laws to enforce MY morality ... Me as a parent do not need any f'n laws..You are in the group that want to impose morality thru fear and ignorance ..

FFH5
Premium
join:2002-03-03
Tavistock NJ
kudos:5

Re: Just face the facts...

said by johnmc963 :

Me as a parent do not need any f'n laws....
And that is why there are laws. Because of that very attitude.

silentlooker
Premium
join:2009-11-01
Exactly, i personally use newsgroups as such they can't me or any other people that use same type of service.
gorehound

join:2009-06-19
Portland, ME
and do you think maybe the reason is the fact these companies have been stealing from us for years and now it is payback ???

think about it...............................i do not buy any new movies from any of these corporate studios.i buy only used now unless it is a tv show i want to lend my support to in the hopes it won't be cancelled.

1.blu-ray vs dvd manufacturing is only pennies difference so why are we paying tens of dollars more for blu-ray...maybe because we are being thieved by them
2.DRM BS.....screw you DRM KRAP

i am sure you can add onto the list of why folks download.
Kearnstd
Space Elf
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Mullica Hill, NJ
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also dont forget the industry has corrupted copyright law to the point that even a dead artist's work it is still piracy. using a big name for example, Elvis died in the 1970s? yet every one of his records is still fully copy protected. Walt Disney died even longer ago but dont get caught making a picture of mickeymouse.

and lets not forget the big one, if you own a diner dont let the music mafia catch you singing Happy Birthday or they will send Tony and Little Tim(who is really 7' 5" 300lbs and carries a bat) over to collect their protection money.

now yes most piracy is of modern materials which are still rightfully under copyright, but our copyright laws are also so perverted and in need of reform it wont be long until we cant create anything new because it was done once already a mere 70 years ago.
--
[65 Arcanist]Filan(High Elf) Zone: Broadband Reports

themonkeyz

join:2007-11-24
Quebec, QC

Re: Just face the facts...

The Person was never really alive. The Man gets a Name for his Person, which is owned by the state with the Man as Beneficiary. The Man can give the Rights of his Person to any other Fiction, Person. When the Man dies the Person still exists. The Fiction lives forever as it was never born, it only berthed. Whoever sails the Ship gets the profits.

Z80A
Premium
join:2009-11-23

1 edit

Spin

Trying to explain the RIAA's utter failure to rally ISPs to their defense. They wanted 3 strike like in some EU countries and if they say any different, they're lying (as usual).
Mr Matt

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Which P2P users? P2P has a non infringing use!

How do the ISP's determine which P2P users are infringing by downloading copyrighted songs. What about those songs that are unrestricted by the copyright owner. I know, the RIAA wants a cut from all musical compositions downloaded, whether the composer/performer wants to be paid or not and whether or not the RIAA owns rights to the compositions/performances in question.

If the compositions are in the public domain who owns the performance copyright. A copyright control agency in Canada recently got the finger by music labels when the copyright control agency could not prove that they owned the performance copyright on the songs in question. The labels already had a license to distribute the compositions. Our lawmakers need a good dose of education. Our copyright system is so complicated that even an experienced Philadelphia Lawyer has a trouble in interpreting the law.

knightmb
Everybody Lies

join:2003-12-01
Franklin, TN

Re: Which P2P users? P2P has a non infringing use!

said by Mr Matt:

How do the ISP's determine which P2P users are infringing by downloading copyrighted songs. What about those songs that are unrestricted by the copyright owner. I know, the RIAA wants a cut from all musical compositions downloaded, whether the composer/performer wants to be paid or not and whether or not the RIAA owns rights to the compositions/performances in question.

If the compositions are in the public domain who owns the performance copyright. A copyright control agency in Canada recently got the finger by music labels when the copyright control agency could not prove that they owned the performance copyright on the songs in question. The labels already had a license to distribute the compositions. Our lawmakers need a good dose of education. Our copyright system is so complicated that even an experienced Philadelphia Lawyer has a trouble in interpreting the law.
You can't, period. When I get those letters, unless it's served by a court, I just put them in the bathroom to use as toilet paper later that day.
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Karl Bode
News Guy
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Re: Which P2P users? P2P has a non infringing use!

How many have you gotten? I'm interested to see what kind of letter volumes people have seen that they've subsequently ignored...

cpsycho

join:2008-06-03
HarperLand

Re: Which P2P users? P2P has a non infringing use!

I have never gotten one letter. I dont download that much, if its a movie I am considering buy or a game thats impossible to buy now a days then yeah I use torrents.

rideboarder
welcome to the social
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Snohomish, WA
I received an email from verizon yesterday about copyright infringement..but other than that I haven't received any in 7 years.

NormanS
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said by Karl Bode:

How many have you gotten? I'm interested to see what kind of letter volumes people have seen that they've subsequently ignored...
Not a single one. But I don't trade music at all, and what I do trade is from sources which are not (nearly as I can tell) members of either the RIAA, or MPAA. I leave their stuff alone; most isn't worth the trouble to get "free". If it isn't worth paying for, it isn't worth having.
--
Norman
~Oh Lord, why have you come
~To Konnyu, with the Lion and the Drum

Musica

@rr.com

Re: Which P2P users? P2P has a non infringing use!

said by NormanS:

said by Karl Bode:

How many have you gotten? I'm interested to see what kind of letter volumes people have seen that they've subsequently ignored...
If it isn't worth paying for, it isn't worth having.
Affirmative.
Pv8man

join:2008-07-24
Hammond, IN
I've gotten a total of two.

one over a year ago and one last week.

NormanS
I gave her time to steal my mind away
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said by Mr Matt:

How do the ISP's determine which P2P users are infringing by downloading copyrighted songs.
My understanding is that they go to the places where songs are traded and join in the trades. I expect that they are only concerned with titles whose copyright holders are RIAA members.
What about those songs that are unrestricted by the copyright owner. I know, the RIAA wants a cut from all musical compositions downloaded, whether the composer/performer wants to be paid or not and whether or not the RIAA owns rights to the compositions/performances in question.
Really? Can you cite a source? I seriously don't see how they can collect fees for titles they (rather their members) don't hold copyright to.
--
Norman
~Oh Lord, why have you come
~To Konnyu, with the Lion and the Drum
Kearnstd
Space Elf
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Re: Which P2P users? P2P has a non infringing use!

said by NormanS:

said by Mr Matt:

How do the ISP's determine which P2P users are infringing by downloading copyrighted songs.
My understanding is that they go to the places where songs are traded and join in the trades. I expect that they are only concerned with titles whose copyright holders are RIAA members.
What about those songs that are unrestricted by the copyright owner. I know, the RIAA wants a cut from all musical compositions downloaded, whether the composer/performer wants to be paid or not and whether or not the RIAA owns rights to the compositions/performances in question.
Really? Can you cite a source? I seriously don't see how they can collect fees for titles they (rather their members) don't hold copyright to.
i dont know about the RIAA but i have heard that BMG/ASCAP have tried to claim they can collect royalties for bands not on their list if the music is played in a public place. even if that place has made some form of separate agreement with said band.
--
[65 Arcanist]Filan(High Elf) Zone: Broadband Reports

NormanS
I gave her time to steal my mind away
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Re: Which P2P users? P2P has a non infringing use!

said by Kearnstd:

i dont know about the RIAA but i have heard that BMG/ASCAP have tried to claim they can collect royalties for bands not on their list if the music is played in a public place. even if that place has made some form of separate agreement with said band.
I have heard that the moon is made of green cheese.
--
Norman
~Oh Lord, why have you come
~To Konnyu, with the Lion and the Drum

silentlooker
Premium
join:2009-11-01
Never gotten such notice, i do use newsgroups instead of p2p so that is most likely the reason why i never gotten a notice.

annony55

@pacbell.net
I'm sure they can put up bait and log ip addresses. Best to go with netflix and avoid the loss of your privacy

silentlooker
Premium
join:2009-11-01

Re: Which P2P users? P2P has a non infringing use!

said by annony55 :

I'm sure they can put up bait and log ip addresses. Best to go with netflix and avoid the loss of your privacy
Do you work for RIAA?

Jason Levine
Premium
join:2001-07-13
USA

Good news here

The good news here is that there seems to be increasing pressure on all sides to stop these lawsuits. Judges are beginning to wise up and not just accept that anything the RIAA presents is 100% fact. Defendants are seeing that that they can fight back if they are innocent instead of just accepting the "easy" $3,000 settlement (and admission of guilt). Artists have publicly gone on record opposing these actions (weakening the RIAA's "we're doing it all for the artists" claim). And now record labels themselves are starting to get skittish about the whole affair. It's just a matter of time before the RIAA's "sue everyone no matter how flimsy the evidence" tactic falls apart completely. I, for one, look forward to that day!
--
-Jason Levine
Support a children's charity. Buy a calendar and/or a photo book. Shooting For A Cause

NickD
Premium
join:2000-11-17
Princeton Junction, NJ

Re: Good news here

I know someone at a major record label that is complaining about MySpace removing his label's own music without the label complaining. In fact, he wants his label's music on MySpace.
eco
Premium
join:2001-11-28
Wilmington, DE

.

I have received two letters, though they were across two different ISPs (Comcast and FiOS). I just ignored them and nothing ever came of it. These days I mostly stick to private trackers for torrents and hosted files like rapidshare and megaupload for downloading my linux ISOs so I'm not too worried about getting many, if any, warnings in the future.
hotwasabi

join:2008-06-15
Westerville, OH

1 edit

1 recommendation

It's my right to get it for free!

I believe in what our dear leader Obama said, "spread the wealth around". I am poor and can't afford to pay for music and movies so I think it's fair that I get it for free! The stinking-rich artists, producers, directors, etc. aren't hurting in these difficult financial times so I am taking my rightful share of their excessive wealth. Power to the people! (You may take this post as being sarcastic and maybe it is...but just a little)
qworster

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Bryn Mawr, PA
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2 edits

Why should Congress and the courts...

Why does Congress and the courts continue to help the RIAA to foist CDs on the American public? The public doesn't WANT CDs any more! They've been saying that with their wallets for YEARS! Yet the clueless RIAA continues to desperately cling to this ancient, obsolete distribution model-and the lawmakers seem hell bent to FORCE americans to use it for all their music needs.

I know--let's legislate that all TV should revert to black and white-that would save the networks a fortune! While we're at it, let's mandate that all TV sets be made up of 100% vacuum tubes too-after all transistors and ICs have decimated the vacuum tube industry!

Let's require that all cars be made 100% out of steel-after all the steel industry is on the skids too.

How come that all these industries were allowed to evolve without government intervention-yet congress refuses to allow digital distribution of music to evolve?

Oh wait-I know! Those industries had COMPETITION working for them! Because manufacturers had to compete against each other for TV set sales, TVs got better and came with features that the public wanted. Because Detroit had to compete with the likes of Toyota and Honda, their quality got better.

NINETY PERCENT of the music in the USA is owned by four companies, acting as a cartel no less. thanks to the RIAA.
As long as this is allowed to continue, THEY will dictate to US how we can get our music legally!

cline3621
Mr. Yuk is MEAN Mr. Yuk is GREEN
Premium
join:2006-06-14
Clarksville, TN

2 recommendations

Times change, so has the media, and medium.

My name is Brad. I am 33 years old. I was a child during the 1980's. Most children, (back then) didn't have much money at their disposal. Am I the only one to record music from an FM radio? I know I'm not. I would say millions of people did that at one point in their lifetimes. Is that 'copyright infringement'? According to the RIAA it is. Did that kill the music business? Of course not. Did it negatively impact their bottom line? Of course not. Were vinyl records, tapes, or early cds laden with drm? Of course not. When you paid for your music you got generally what you wanted, and you were able to do what you wanted with the media. However, when you recorded from the radio, you always got the one or two songs you wanted, as well as a few seconds of DJ banter sometimes, and you were still able to do what you wanted with the tape. Hell there are times I record from my Sirius satellite radio. And now that I think of it, the music industry had to be dragged kicking and screaming into the satellite radio/streaming music business. They fought like hell to kill the TimeTrax hardware and software.

Now, flash forward 27 years, to the present, where most people under the age of 20 have never seen or held a cassette tape, or vinyl record. They have their Ipod, or in my case the Archos 5 internet media tablet, which is better than the Ipod. (Take that Apple!) Why is people recording (or copying) music from a disinterested 3rd party, like a website, newsgroup or p2p a problem to the RIAA? I don't think its any different than the alternative we had in the 1980's. Just my personal opinion. Also before the corporate shills show up and call me a thief, and so on, I pay for Napster, I've been paying for Napster for about 3 years now, and will continue to pay for their service as long as i get value for my money. Or I completely download their entire catalog, and use tunebite to remove the drm. (I better buy more multi-terabyte hard drives then )

You want to know the reason most people pirate? Convenience! It's usually cheap or free, there is no drm, (I remove the drm that comes with Napster) you get what you want in a timely manner, and so on. When you want to be legal about something its usually the complete opposite of the qualities I listed above.
I remember getting into a pissing match with some lady at Microsoft years ago, due to getting a scratched windows98 oem cd. They wanted me to pay $50 to have a replacement sent to me after paying for the original copy. I think the lady on the other end of the phone got pissed when I laughed in her face, and told her, "No thanks ma'am, I'm gonna borrow my friends cd and make a copy". See? That was convenient for me. And yes I did make a copy of a Win98SE OEM cd. If and when its convenient for a person to pay for legal media, be it music, movies or software, most people will. Case in point. My copy of Windows 7. Totally legit, other than Vista this is the only other OS I've paid for, because it was convenient! I downloaded Windows 7 Ultimate X64 from Microsoft in about 1 hour, paid them $139 for it, and got emailed the key. It was that simple.

Unfortunately until the old geezers pushing their "its 1970" business model go away, we are going to be stuck with the logic of: This is our cd, (or software, or movie) your only paying to listen to it, by yourself, in your own house, and no one else may listen to it unless they pay us first, and you can only play it on this player. This is the type of bullshit that cause DIVX to fail. If you remember walking around a circuit city store around this time in 1998 you know what I'm talking about, and not the video codec.

On one final note, I can remember getting a nasty email from some of the people at Fox's corporate broadcast arm. I wished I would have saved them, as well as my replies. I thought they were quite comical. Anyways here is the story. Back in 2005 (i think it was 2005) they started showing "24" in January. They would play the entire season from January to end of April early May time frame. They would start by playing the first 2 episodes on a Sunday. Usually after the AFC championship game. Well on this Sunday, the game went off at 8:15pm eastern. No problem, start playing the tape at 8:15pm. Unfortunately there were several affiliates, who didn't preempt their local 10:00pm news. So people missed the last 15-20 minutes of the 1st episode. People got pissed. This is where I come in. I recorded said episode to my dvr. I then set up my own streaming media server. I went to fox's "24" message board and told people how to open their media player to my domain name (at the time) to watch the last 20 mins of the show. I was in such a hurry I actually left the commercials in. I started the streaming media center, and figured "oh hell 20 people or so will show up" oh god i was wrong. In that 20 minutes I was using windows media encoder 9, encoding at roughly 700kbps, and had at one point about 63,000 different computers connected and watching. The scary point is that
some really savvy people pulled an internet whois and started sending me emails. One guy actually pulled my phone number from it. The phone call and most of the emails were to say thanks and so on. The phone call scared the shit out of me though. I don't post personal info when I register domain names now, learned my lesson there. However I got 2 emails directly from fox. They were pissed off. You would think they would be happy I was rebroadcasting they show, with commercials in no less and not for any financial gain on my part. Basically the first was a cease and desist. The second seemed to me more of an arrogant and sarcastic 'up yours, don't you know who we are?' email, to which I replied "yes, your a multi-billion entertainment conglomerate, who can't even stream a show from your website, while one of your fans, using inexpensive computer hardware, did your job for you, at no cost to you, your welcome". I wished I would have saved those emails. I would have posted them on here for your reading pleasure. I haven't typed anything this long in some time now. I'm tired and going to bed. Good night, and merry Christmas.

Selenia
Gentoo Convert
Premium
join:2006-09-22
Fort Smith, AR
kudos:2

None here...

but the only copyrighted content I trade is out of print games for old consoles and computers. I love the classics. If the companies wanted to make these gems available once again, I'd certainly reward them for it by buying stuff like that. I guess I am a bit under the radar as I have no interest in pirating another lousy music album or movie. Everything else I torrent is legal(Linux and FOSS related). Good local artists offer their music for free and TV rots your brain. Speaking of TV, the few shows I do watch don't need to be pirated, either. They are available legally streaming online. Just think about something, many of you complain about the crap RIAA/MPAA releases, then send the opposite message that you want more of the same by pirating their materials.
--
deltree /y C:\*.*

cork1958
Cork
Premium
join:2000-02-26

P2P?

C'mon, who uses P2P anymore?

It's so easy to get anything WITHOUT even needing that kind of crapware stuff on a computer anymore it's ridiculous!

I've never received any letter from Charter or Verizon and I download stuff just about all day long. Key thing is the uploading/sharing part I DON'T partake in!!

Like I said, stuff is so easy to get WITHOUT sharing, it's stupid!
--
The Firefox alternative.
»www.mozilla.org/projects/seamonkey/

Bill Neilson
Premium
join:2009-07-08
Arlington, VA

Re: P2P?

I do not but MANY friends still use P2P

It seems to me to be the easy first choice for newbies downloading music (besides itunes)

Psst

@91.200.162.x
I wonder how they gonna stop DC++?

BBBanditRuR
Dingbits

join:2009-06-02
Parachute, CO
Reviews:
·Comcast

Vietnam

In Vietnam, my father used reel to reel tapes to copy hundreds (maybe a thousands?) of albums/songs. Everybody shared. That was then, this is now. What's the difference? In my opinion, nothing except the technology used to do so. Quit avoiding the inevitable and start releasing your music/movies the way people want and at a decent price without DRM. MOVE ON!