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Senate Report Highlights Total Secrecy in User Data Collection
by Karl Bode 08:37AM Thursday Dec 26 2013
As noted frequently, there have been no serious efforts to update consumer privacy protections in the modern age, and as a result nearly everythinng you do or say online is collected or sold in one fashion or another, without you having much of a say so. Ars Technica offers up an interesting discussion on a recent Senate report that tried to get data collection firms to disclose how exactly they collect user data and what they do with it, and not too surprisingly, none of them (from Experia to Datalogix) wanted to talk much about it:
quote:
What the companies would not specify in full were their sources for consumer data. Three companies, Acxiom, Experian, and Epsilon, would not reveal the sources of their data, citing confidentiality clauses as the reason. The other data brokers said that their data comes from free government and public databases, along with purchase or license data from “retailers,” “financial institutions,” and “other data brokers,” which were otherwise described as “third-party partners.”
Those anonymous partners include numerous companies, including social networking sites like Facebook, and broadband and wireless providers. That secrecy certainly extends to broadband providers, who for more than a decade have denied that they even collect or sell even clickstream data, much less the variety of data provided by newer technologies like deep packet inspection.

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meeeeeeeeee

join:2003-07-13
Newburgh, NY

1 recommendation

Hmmmmm....

When the spooks at NSA go before Congress and tell bold face lies, No one in Congress blinks, but when companies legitimately don't spill their guts to Congress about the LEGAL things they do, the Senate has to write reports and investigate. Yes, people deserve more privacy but there are more pressing matters to be dealt with. Experia et al, won't be sending anyone off to the gulag.
--
"when the people have suffered many abuses under the control of a totalitarian leader, they not only have the right but the duty to overthrow that government." - The U.S. Declaration of Independence
TheRogueX

join:2003-03-26
Springfield, MO

Re: Hmmmmm....

How do we know they're doing things legally? They refused to tell Congress what they were doing. Corporations basically just told the Senate that they are above the law and don't have to explain themselves.

meeeeeeeeee

join:2003-07-13
Newburgh, NY

1 edit

Re: Hmmmmm....

said by TheRogueX:

How do we know they're doing things legally? They refused to tell Congress what they were doing. Corporations basically just told the Senate that they are above the law and don't have to explain themselves.

Gee... just like the alphabet soup agencies only the alphabet soup agencies are supposed to be overseen by Congress and are supposed to truthfully and honestly keep Congress informed, not lie under oath (perjury, a crime) and attempt to hide and obfuscate the truth (conspiracy, a whole BUNCH of crimes). Personally I'm a whole lot more concerned that no one seems interested in investigating and prosecuting people who can kick my door down in the night and drag me off to the gulag, committing KNOWN crimes than I am concerned about someone snooping on me to try to sell me a credit card possibly bending some very weak and poorly written and outdated privacy laws.

--
"when the people have suffered many abuses under the control of a totalitarian leader, they not only have the right but the duty to overthrow that government." - The U.S. Declaration of Independence

Probitas

@teksavvy.com

Install No Script

Use Firefox and install No Script, and block those data collected cookies before they start.

tshirt
Premium
join:2004-07-11
Snohomish, WA
kudos:5

1 recommendation

Re: Install No Script

said by Probitas :

Use Firefox and install No Script, and block those data collected cookies before they start.

probably about as effective as RSA encryption.

dslcreature
Premium
join:2010-07-10
Seattle, WA
If you are ever bored and looking for something to do fire up wireshark and type 'dns' into the filter box. Then fire up your favorite browser and visit any popular web site. The number of requests made to all manner of tracking/metrics services is so absurd and redundant it defies belief. Between cnn/abc/cbs/fox websites blackholed about 70 domains of all manner of tracking and business intelligence services. I won't pretend to speculate what their all for ... the sheer number is a bit creepy.

humanfilth

join:2013-02-14
cyber gutter

security of the person

It is always amusing to see that the government and corporations unlawfully harvesting your data and doing all sorts of unlawful stuff with it, while they scream and moan that your Rights do not exist in the case as there is no 'exact' wording in your Constitutional(Charter) Rights that says they can't do it.

Right to privacy.
Security of the person to prevent unwarranted harvesting/searching of data.
Unlawful wiretapping is exactly what DPI does.
And the rest....

Oh but you say that if the government changes the law to make crimes such as this legal, well what the government made legal is still illegal under the law, so which politician wants to get the first 50 year prison term for violating the Peoples Rights via unlawful laws?

One day, the Prime Minister/President of Canada/U.S.A. will stop renewing martial law(morons call it the Patriot act or other silly names). The militarized police forces(including the politicians who get the stuff) will do everything they can to prevent the loss of all that blood money that get lots of deadly toys from the military industrial complex.
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Knowledge and curiosity are not crimes and those who are curious should not be treated like criminals.. »www.eff.org/https-everywhere

firephoto
We the people
Premium
join:2003-03-18
Brewster, WA

Internet startups

So these new shiny companies that pop up with an app, get popular, are all the rage, have multiple rounds of tens of millions of dollars of investments to help the operate given to them by people who never lose money.

Communicate with another person with your internet connected device? Yes? In the year 1999 perhaps? earlier? So a new to the scene "app" that does all that is suddenly worth pouring tens of millions of dollars into as an investment? Yea, they're taking your personal information and selling it, they're showing you ads and selling your response to them, they're scraping the things you talk about and making profitable predictions with that info. Who cares, you're not wearing last years colored shoes, and your jackets have the proper number of buttons for this year too, it's all good.
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Say no to those that ‘inadvertently make false representations’.

meeeeeeeeee

join:2003-07-13
Newburgh, NY

2 edits

Has anyone considered...

That this whole sudden interest on the part of the U.S. Senate on "the people's privacy" is yet another distraction to make the sheeple stop looking at what the Government is doing to destroy people's rights and freedoms and focus the sheeple's attention on the "Big, Evil Corporations"? Congress has ignored "the people's privacy" in regards to modern technology for DECADES, so why the sudden interest? IF they truly ARE so concerned, why not start where they already have full authority to act and with those that can actually do the most harm to the citizens they suddenly are so concerned with, somewhere there is ALREADY A KNOWN, DOCUMENTED PROBLEM; start in their OWN sandbox and reign in the guys that can bust down the citizen's door in the middle of the night and take everyone off to the gulag.

"LOOK... OVER THERE... IT'S THE BIG, EVIL CORPORATION!!" spying on you to sell you chachkies!! Don't look at US who are spying on you to take your LIFE. Amerikan sheeple are so easily distracted...
--
"when the people have suffered many abuses under the control of a totalitarian leader, they not only have the right but the duty to overthrow that government." - The U.S. Declaration of Independence

linicx
Caveat Emptor
Premium
join:2002-12-03
United State

Uh huh

Banks have said for years they report late, slow and default payments to Fair Isaac. Maybe that's a lie too?
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Mac: No windows, No Gates, Apple inside