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Six Strikes Delayed Until Early Next Year
CCI Blames Sandy For Testing Schedule Delays
by Karl Bode 09:10AM Thursday Nov 29 2012
Mirroring what I'd been hearing in my own recent conversations with ISPs, it appears that the entertainment industry and ISPs have again delayed the launch of their "six strikes" anti-piracy initiative until sometime early next year. In a post at their website the group responsible for overseeing the controversial program (the Center for Copyright Information) blames the delay on Hurricane Sandy, which they insist delayed the testing schedule for numerous ISPs. Leaked AT&T documents had originally claimed the system was to go live this week.

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"Our goal has always been to implement the program in a manner that educates consumers about copyright and peer-to-peer networks, encourages the use of legal alternatives, safeguards customer privacy, and provides an easy-to-use independent review program for consumers to challenge alerts they believe they’ve received in error," insists the organization.

"We need to be sure that all of our “I”s are dotted and “T”s crossed before any company begins sending alerts, and we know that those who are following our progress will agree."

As I've been exploring, customers accused of piracy will be treated differently by different ISPs under the program, with some ISPs choosing to throttle repeat offenders, and others forcing customers to click through websites and read "educational" materials before being able to browse the Internet. The program remains hugely unpopular among consumers and ISPs alike, given it assumes guilt, jacks up costs for ISPs (read: you), relies on unreliable IP address evidence, and involves users paying a $35 fee to protest their innocence.

Several executives at various ISPs I've talked to are not thrilled by the system, which they realize will create significant additional work for their support agents. It also may have little real impact on piracy, given there's no "end game" after a user receives a sixth strike, and there's nothing preventing users from fleeing to proxy or VPN services to mask their downloading habits from their ISP. Two outcomes are certain however: your broadband bill will go up, and companies like BTGuard or TorGuard are going to make a killing in 2013.

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Desdinova
Premium
join:2003-01-26
Gaithersburg, MD

Hmmm...

How about we just give the initiative six strikes? Seems to me that this current delay would be, what, strike four? Two more and this sucker'd be gone.

FFH5
Premium
join:2002-03-03
Tavistock NJ
kudos:5

Proxys & VPNs that are responsive cost $

nothing preventing users from fleeing to proxy or VPN services to mask their downloading habits from their ISP

Only 1 problem. A fast and responsive VPN or proxy isn't free. And those who don't want to pay for their music or movies are probably too cheap to pay for one.
--
A democracy cannot exist as a permanent form of government. It can only exist until the voters discover that they can vote themselves money from the public treasury.

cdru
Go Colts
Premium,MVM
join:2003-05-14
Fort Wayne, IN
kudos:7

Re: Proxys & VPNs that are responsive cost $

said by FFH5:

Only 1 problem. A fast and responsive VPN or proxy isn't free. And those who don't want to pay for their music or movies are probably too cheap to pay for one.

That's why proxy and vpn services aren't popular and are hard to find. It's also why you can't find any Usenet providers for $10 or $15 a month unlimited.

Oh wait. None of that is true. For the price of one dvd, bluray, or your average CD, you get a months worth of as much as you more or less want. The VPN, proxy, or usenet service is like a condom. It's not a guarantee you won't have any consequences from what you're doing, but it's cheap protection that goes a lot further in prevention then nothing at all.

I'd imagine that an overwhelming number of users that pirate because they don't want to pay would pay $10-20 a month for a Netflix-like service that wasn't incumbered by DRM, open for the player/operating system/device of your choice, and had a full catalog of all mainstream movies that are released. But such a service will never exist.
zevus

join:2010-11-29
Chandler, TX
Reviews:
·CenturyLink
said by FFH5:

nothing preventing users from fleeing to proxy or VPN services to mask their downloading habits from their ISP

Only 1 problem. A fast and responsive VPN or proxy isn't free. And those who don't want to pay for their music or movies are probably too cheap to pay for one.

Well, I'd go for the kimsufi mKS 2G @ $12 vs. some VPN @ $7 or $8... and you can find unlimited usenet access @ $15 a month.

CptSpaulding

join:2009-07-21
Cincinnati, OH

1 edit

It'd be cheaper to pay the $35

Although you'll have to deal with a click thru every now and then. If your throttled will that have a click thru to undo? Anyone with half a brain would be using a private tracker anyways.

keepontruckn

@optonline.net

nevermind...

oh, nevermind.... keep on pirating-- they delayed it AGAIN!

lol...

jubangy
Premium
join:2005-03-26
Corry, PA

Maybe

Maybe the whole $35 scheme is their end game. A lot cheaper for them to just blast out some letters, and wait for the people to start ponying up the dough to appeal the letter and walla, they give you an apology (maybe) and before you hang up the phone probably send another. They are going to be making some easy cash.