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Suprising Nobody, Dish To Win Lion's Share of H Block Spectrum
by Karl Bode 04:25PM Thursday Feb 27 2014
Surprising absolutely nobody, Dish should announce this week that the company is the big winner in the FCC's H Block auction, which officially closed today after meeting the $1.56 billion set reserve price exactly. The "win" wasn't hard; other potential suitors for the spectrum dropped out months ago. The acquisition makes Charlie Ergen's Dish the fifth largest spectrum holder in the country.

As we've often noted, Dish has professed interest in building their own LTE network. As such, they've been making a lot of spectrum moves, but if and when Dish's network gets off the ground (or if they just turn around and sell that spectrum) remains anybody's guess. And a lot of people spend a lot of time guessing.

The FCC issued the following statement on the close of the H Block auction:
quote:
"With this successful auction, the Commission makes good on its commitment to unleash more spectrum for consumers and businesses, delivering a significant down payment towards funding the nationwide interoperable public safety network. The H Block auction is a win for the American people, and we thank Chairwoman Clyburn for her leadership scheduling it. We also commend everyone who worked so hard to resolve technical issues that made this previously unusable spectrum valuable."
The details of the auction (surprise! Dish won nearly all of the licenses!) should be revealed in the "coming days," notes the FCC.

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EliteData
EliteData
Premium
join:2003-07-06
Long Island,
kudos:7

who gets the money ?

the FCC ?
the US Government ?

Kommie
Premium
join:2003-05-13
united state
kudos:3

Re: who gets the money ?

The Pentagon and the MIC.

Just like 80% of our Income Tax Revenue.
whiteyonenh

join:2004-08-09
Keene, NH

Hmm...

Also, probably surprising nobody, Dish to sit on the spectrum until closer to the build-out requirement's deadline, if any, then attempt to resell the spectrum for profit.

I don't see Dish actually DOING anything truly useful with the spectrum, but that's just me.

If Dish actually does something with it, and covers places that are not currently covered by better/cheaper options, I would be very surprised.
Skippy25

join:2000-09-13
Hazelwood, MO

Re: Hmm...

One would hope the FCC has learned from the past and has some kind of use it or lose it condition on it.

toby
Troy Mcclure

join:2001-11-13
Portland, OR

Re: Hmm...

said by Skippy25:

One would hope the FCC has learned from the past and has some kind of use it or lose it condition on it.

This is the FCC should give the spectrum to companies to use for free, and if they don't use it within a given time frame it is given to someone else.

This stops the companies spending all the money on the spectrum without having any left to actually build the systems to use the spectrum.

anonomeX

@comcast.net
Every Hopper will come with VoLTE? (just speak into the remote)
sonicmerlin

join:2009-05-24
Cleveland, OH
kudos:1

Most importantly

What so few people seem to talk about is how Dish had almost no competition for the spectrum from any of the major carriers. This same pattern of disinterest in spectrum auctions has played out throughout the rest of the developed world as well.

What we're seeing is a glut of excess spectrum that nobody wants. LTE has massively increased network capacity to the point that no one needs anymore. Despite this we continue to see abusively low caps and absurdly expensive ovareges from the largest carriers. It goes to show you how uncompetitive the wireless market is.

toby
Troy Mcclure

join:2001-11-13
Portland, OR

Re: Most importantly

This spectrum had conditions on it, it is for low power use only.

Dish can use this for wireless internet.

Dish is trialing this service in some areas.
»about.dish.com/press-release/cor ··· nd-pilot

I see this is a good purchase by Dish.

anonomeX

@comcast.net

Re: Most importantly

Yep -- would be an excellent new Hopper feature.
BiggA
Premium
join:2005-11-23
EARTH
It might work in super rural areas, but it's a 5x5, so it doesn't have much capacity...
BiggA
Premium
join:2005-11-23
EARTH
That trial is also using 2.6ghz spectrum.

toby
Troy Mcclure

join:2001-11-13
Portland, OR

Re: Most importantly

said by BiggA:

That trial is also using 2.6ghz spectrum.

Yep, as that is all they can use.

5x5 is fine, directional low power, something is better than nothing where a lot of the country as zero choice besides satellite.
BiggA
Premium
join:2005-11-23
EARTH

Re: Most importantly

I'll be excited if they can put something together that actually works halfway well with a single 5x5 for home internet access. I just don't see it when you only have what 36 or 38mbps of bandwidth per sector? So either it's going to be slow as molasses, or one customer will be able to saturate the whole sector. It's like using a single channel of DOCSIS 2 in this day and age. I think they have a much better shot of doing something exciting with the 2.6ghz spectrum if they have access to a decent amount of it, or partnering with Sprint to expand Sprint's network footprint, and provide rural broadband.

Also, satellite isn't so bad anymore. Exceed is doing like 12mbps, the biggest issue there is data caps, as you don't get much bandwidth per month...
sonicmerlin

join:2009-05-24
Cleveland, OH
kudos:1
Both AT&T and Verizon have rural wireless ISP ambitions, with verizon having already rolled out a heavily capped service with expensive overages. Despite this neither had interest in the spectrum.
BiggA
Premium
join:2005-11-23
EARTH

Re: Most importantly

Yeah, they're running a heavily capped service that's not that much different from mobile LTE. It's not well set up for a home service, since they charge overages.

Mr Guy

@charter.com
said by sonicmerlin:

What we're seeing is a glut of excess spectrum that nobody wants. LTE has massively increased network capacity to the point that no one needs anymore. Despite this we continue to see abusively low caps and absurdly expensive ovareges from the largest carriers. It goes to show you how uncompetitive the wireless market is.

So many things wrong with your post. Carriers need MUCH more capacity. Oh and more competition would mean spectrum split even more which means even LESS capacity.

First the spectrum was 5 MHz and it was useless to at&t and Verizon since it wasn't adjacent to any other spectrum they had. Would have been useful to Sprint or T-mobile why they balked is anyone's guess.

robbyglack

@comcastbusiness.net

lease to sprint ?

this spectrum woudl be really useful for sprint to pair up with its g block doubling capacity on it's PCS band LTE network. perhaps dish will lease it to sprint. another possiblity is that dish wants it to remain unused as to elevate interference concerns from its 20x20 block of 2ghz spectrum, if they plan to deploy there

Mr Guy

@charter.com

Re: lease to sprint ?

said by robbyglack :

this spectrum woudl be really useful for sprint to pair up with its g block doubling capacity on it's PCS band LTE network. perhaps dish will lease it to sprint. another possiblity is that dish wants it to remain unused as to elevate interference concerns from its 20x20 block of 2ghz spectrum, if they plan to deploy there

Sprint had a chance to bid on it and didn't.

toby
Troy Mcclure

join:2001-11-13
Portland, OR

Re: lease to sprint ?

said by Mr Guy :

said by robbyglack :

this spectrum woudl be really useful for sprint to pair up with its g block doubling capacity on it's PCS band LTE network. perhaps dish will lease it to sprint. another possiblity is that dish wants it to remain unused as to elevate interference concerns from its 20x20 block of 2ghz spectrum, if they plan to deploy there

Sprint had a chance to bid on it and didn't.

Sprint didn't want, it had power restrictions.

Besides, Sprint isn't using 80% of the spectrum they do own, they only service cities, just like T-Mobile.

rit56

join:2000-12-01
New York, NY

Comcast wins

Now they can say of course there's plenty of competition. Approve the merger/buyout.