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Verizon Dedicated To FCC Process, Except When They're Not
Please ignore closed-door deals and heavy-handed political pressure
by Karl Bode 11:02AM Thursday Aug 05 2010
As we noted yesterday, somebody either at the FCC or at the carriers has leaked the news that Google and Verizon have quietly hatched a network neutrality agreement they then presented to the FCC on a platter. This of course comes on the heels of news that the FCC has had repeated backdoor meetings with carriers, and is getting very close to unveiling a neutrality deal (we assume based on the Google/Verizon agreement) that's largely filled with loopholes. In responding to yesterday's leaks, Verizon e-mailed a statement to press outlets insisting they're still committed to the FCC process:
quote:
"We've been working with Google for 10 months to reach an agreement on broadband policy. We are currently engaged in and committed to the negotiation process led by the FCC. We are optimistic this process will reach a consensus that can maintain an open Internet and the investment and innovation required to sustain it."
Except Verizon's supposed "commitment" to the FCC process involves negotiating back room deals that they hope will be used as the foundation of neutrality rules with little to no public input. This commitment to the FCC process also apparently involves their CEO putting political pressure on White House Chief of Staff Rahm Emanuel to hurry up and get a deal done, even if it's largely an empty one. Over at their blog, Verizon gets even more vocal about how they're really dedicated to this whole openness thing:
quote:
The NYT article regarding conversations between Google and Verizon is mistaken. It fundamentally misunderstands our purpose. As we said in our earlier FCC filing, our goal is an Internet policy framework that ensures openness and accountability, and incorporates specific FCC authority, while maintaining investment and innovation. To suggest this is a business arrangement between our companies is entirely incorrect.
In fact Verizon was so interested in "openness and accountability," they spent much of this year busily hashing out network neutrality policies with Google nobody knew existed, with no input from the public.

Some things to keep in mind. Most of these news reports on the Google/Verizon negotiations seem simply wrong (like this one in the NY Times). For starters, it seems incredibly unlikely Google would agree to paid prioritization of any kind. The goal of whatever deal Google and Verizon have struck is to solely to pre-empt tougher FCC rules with weak voluntary guidelines. It's also important to note that Google's involvement in this process absolutely does not mean the policies cooked up by the two companies will be good for consumers.

You might recall that back in March Verizon and Google penned a joint editorial in the Wall Street Journal arguing that both companies were opposed to government regulation (at least when it doesn't protect monopolies or bathe them in taxpayer money) on the neutrality front. As such, they've cooked up this voluntary screed as their solution, and every indication is that a timid FCC is prepared to use it as the cornerstone of their new neutrality rules.

Verizon of course is eager to get similar voluntary guidelines applied to privacy, given Verizon likes to argue that public shame will keep them honest. Of course self-regulatory efforts like this rarely work out well for consumers, given they lack any real penalties or teeth. They especially don't work well in markets with limited competition, given most consumers lack the choice of options allowing them to vote with their wallet.

With an FCC that's unwilling to pass tough rules or tackle broadband competition, the end result may not be pretty. It's not quite as dire as some news outlets are insisting (specifically that Google would suddenly agree to sell consumers up the river and pay Verizon for faster access to their customers), but the deal is troublesome. Most notably, it continues the tradition of a sector's wealthiest companies crafting meaningless rules in private in order to derail tougher consumer protections.

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FFH5
Premium
join:2002-03-03
Tavistock NJ
kudos:5

2 edits

1 recommendation

The process is a political process & all participate

»Verizon Dedicated To FCC Process, Except When They're Not
Except Verizon's supposed "commitment" to the FCC process involves negotiating back room deals that they hope will be used as the foundation of neutrality rules with little to no public input. This commitment to the FCC process also apparently involves their CEO putting political pressure on White House Chief of Staff Rahm Emanuel to hurry up and get a deal done, even if it's largely an empty one.
Verizon is following the FCC process because the FCC process is a political process. THE FCC IS A POLITICAL ENTITY. And everything that Verizon, Google, AT&T, Comcast, etc are doing is just part of a political process. It is called lobbying and that is how this game is played and the FCC is not some neutral arbiter not part of that process. The FCC have their own political actors with their own agendas as well(Copps being the main FCC person with his own agenda) and they are competing with others at the FCC and with those being regulated.

To some how decide that there exists some PROCESS at the FCC outside of normal political horsetrading is just refusing to recognize that when competing interests jockey for advantage politics is the game being played.
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seaman
Premium
join:2000-12-08
Seattle, WA

Disappointed

I expect this kind of stuff from Verizon, Qwest, and Comcast, etc. But wasnt Google's slogan- "Dont be evil" or something like that?
WernerSchutz

join:2009-08-04
Sugar Land, TX

Re: Disappointed

said by seaman:

I expect this kind of stuff from Verizon, Qwest, and Comcast, etc. But wasnt Google's slogan- "Dont be evil" or something like that?
well, they can always redefine what "evil" is. If it is good for them, then it must not be evil.
mpellegrini

join:2009-02-22
Tacoma, WA

Tiered service for Google...

This just in from the NY Times: »www.nytimes.com/2010/08/05/techn···?_r=1&hp

Tiered service levels with Google and others paying to "prioritize" certain traffic. And so ends the internet...

blueeyesm

join:2003-09-05
Waterloo, ON

Re: Tiered service for Google...

... and so ends their profit as people will go to many lengths find any ISP, large or small, that will not do this to their customers.

If all ISPs move to this agreement, you'll see people leave in big numbers. They simply won't be able to afford it.

That's what these companies tend to forget; we can always vote with our wallets.
ZachAttack

join:2009-05-30
Yorba Linda, CA

GooglePubPolicy on Twitter says the story is bunk.

Google says the story is completely untrue.

»twitter.com/googlepubpolicy/stat···93606477

"@NYTimes is wrong. We've not had any convos with VZN about paying for carriage of our traffic. We remain committed to an open internet."

FFH5
Premium
join:2002-03-03
Tavistock NJ
kudos:5

Re: GooglePubPolicy on Twitter says the story is bunk.

said by ZachAttack:

Google says the story is completely untrue.

»twitter.com/googlepubpolicy/stat···93606477

"@NYTimes is wrong. We've not had any convos with VZN about paying for carriage of our traffic. We remain committed to an open internet."
The key words here: about paying for carriage of our traffic

Meaning that Google hasn't denied meeting with Verizon about net neutrality; the FCC; or any number of subjects. Just that they deny mtg about "paying for carriage". Meaning they could still have talked about prioritizing traffic(just not PAYING for that).
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