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Verizon Handed Over AP Data, No Questions Asked
Company Doesn't Much Want to Talk About it
by Karl Bode 02:22PM Friday May 17 2013 Tipped by telcodad See Profile
Earlier this week the government came under fire for hoovering up the personal call logs of more than twenty lines belonging to the Associated Press. Initially Uncle Same claimed the snooping and violation of press rights was due to an immediate and pressing life-risking investigation, but as the week rolled on it became clear the government was simply embarrassed by internal leaks and annoyed an AP story stole some public relations thunder. It has also since been made clear that Verizon Wireless was the company that handed over the data without a second thought:
quote:
Click for full size
When the feds came knocking for AP journalists’ call records last year, Verizon apparently turned the data over with no questions asked. The New York Times, citing an AP employee, reported Tuesday that at least two of the reporters’ personal cellphone records "were provided to the government by Verizon Wireless without any attempt to obtain permission to tell them so the reporters could ask a court to quash the subpoena."

I contacted Verizon Wireless for comment, querying whether the AP incident may prompt the company to change its policy regarding how it responds to such requests. Spokeswoman Debra Lewis said Verizon Wireless complied "with legal processes with regard to requests from law enforcement" but wouldn’t comment on specific cases. In regard to a change of policy, Lewis said she was “not going to speculate on what may or may not happen in the future."
Granted the law muzzles most of the people to whom these requests are made, but that doesn't mean that carriers have to be quite so mindlessly compliant every time government knocks. We've seen repeated instances where time after time, carriers showed absolutely no independent intelligence or ethics when considering whether to help the government break the law. Only small carriers, like Sonic.net, have bothered to show anything resembling a spine.

In fact, instead of standing up to government, carriers often urge government to take domestic surveillance further. Numerous whistleblowers have pointed out that carriers not only gave the NSA a live feed to ALL data on their networks (both theirs and other companies), but in some cases actively counseled the FBI on how to best violate surveillance law. As Wired noted in 2010, AT&T even volunteered their time as intelligence analysts.

There's tens of billions of unaccountable government subsidies, tax breaks and contracts at risk if these companies don't comply, which should give you a clear indication of just how much your privacy is worth to them when the government calls.

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FFH
Premium
join:2002-03-03
Tavistock NJ
kudos:5

1 recommendation

Put blame where it belongs - an admin cover-up

Verizon is not the villain here. It is an administration that wanted to muzzle the press and coverup its misdeeds. Verizon merely responded to legal demands by the justice department for info. Trying to spread the blame and muddy the waters is just an attempt to let the real villains off the hook.
--
"If you want to anger a conservative lie to him.
If you want to anger a liberal tell him the truth."

humanfilth

join:2013-02-14
cyber gutter

1 edit

Re: Put blame where it belongs - an admin cover-up

But if Verizon and a multitude of other companies believed in the law of 'warrant please', plus 'lets see if this warrant you finally got is actually valid', people wouldn't continue to be illegally searched and illegally fondled since Dubyas 9/11 B.S.

If the corporation is then punished for refusing to give out unwarranted private information like its raining, then they must purposely publish that information. But then the catch22 of how the corporations bribes to the government may no longer be honored for a few months.

Patriot Act is better known as Martial Law. Different name but still a crime against the people.
Once you let government do something, its really hard to stop it years later as law enforcement and people who think they are law enforcement since they got a uniform and a shiny badge grows accustomed to violating people in the name of paranoia.

Meanwhile certain unhinged members of congress and the senate keep asking questions of Administration appointees and Administration officers who can't answer the questions due to the answers being a National secret. Leaks from morons in elected office are so fun to investigate.
Paranoid conspiracy nuts on National Defense and People who think the world is 6,000 years old who are on Science committees. what a clusterf*ck.
axus

join:2001-06-18
Washington, DC
Reviews:
·Comcast
Verizon is a bad guy here. They had the right to request clarification, and do a little more to protect the privacy of their customers. I agree that the justice department is the real villain here, but let's not muddy the waters and let Verizon off the hook.

skeechan
Ai Otsukaholic
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join:2012-01-26
AA169|170
kudos:2

1 recommendation

Re: Put blame where it belongs - an admin cover-up

...And face the wrath of the most corrupt and vindictive administration in history? Yeah right.
--
Nocchi rules.

KrK
Heavy Artillery For The Little Guy
Premium
join:2000-01-17
Tulsa, OK

Re: Put blame where it belongs - an admin cover-up

Hmmm. Not in Office, at the moment. So, unlikely.

CylonRed
Premium,MVM
join:2000-07-06
Bloom County
Yea - right... I can think of many other admins worse - several in fact.

Thanks for the laugh - I needed it.

JakCrow

join:2001-12-06
Palo Alto, CA
Reviews:
·SONIC.NET
said by skeechan:

...And face the wrath of the most corrupt and vindictive administration in history? Yeah right.

Were you saying the same thing when the previous administration was also doing the same? I'm betting no.

skeechan
Ai Otsukaholic
Premium
join:2012-01-26
AA169|170
kudos:2

1 edit

Re: Put blame where it belongs - an admin cover-up

The dolts in the previous admin were pikers compared to the Chicago machine, but way to deflect.
--
Nocchi rules.

battleop

join:2005-09-28
00000
Don't forget that carriers charge anywhere from $500-1500 per record so this is a huge profit center for them.
--
I do not, have not, and will not work for AT&T/Comcast/Verizon/Charter or similar sized company.

KrK
Heavy Artillery For The Little Guy
Premium
join:2000-01-17
Tulsa, OK


But, I thought the press was all liberal and did that stuff on it's own?

Right?

KrK
Heavy Artillery For The Little Guy
Premium
join:2000-01-17
Tulsa, OK
And this is the fruition of policies supporting illegal wiretaps and the retroactive immunity..... Which you were quite a champion of on these forums....
--
"Fascism should more properly be called corporatism because it is the merger of state and corporate power." -- Benito Mussolini
wkm001

join:2009-12-14

Burner phones for all the...

press!!!
sparky007

join:2011-08-25
Avondale, AZ
Reviews:
·Vonage

Re: Burner phones for all the...

Burner Phones for everyone since the Osama adminstration is in charge.

meeeeeeeeee

join:2003-07-13
Newburgh, NY

1 recommendation

Re: Burner phones for all the...

said by sparky007:

Burner Phones for everyone since the Osama adminstration is in charge.

It started long before Osama took office and will not end until the sheeple wake up and demand that those that violate the Constitution and the laws of the land be imprisoned for it OR they just string them all up with piano wire from the nearest lamppost.
--
"when the people have suffered many abuses under the control of a totalitarian leader, they not only have the right but the duty to overthrow that government." - The U.S. Declaration of Independence

Anon1

@mycingular.net

Disclosure regarding subpoenas is illegal

I doubt most of you have actually been issued one of these. The language on these letters and court orders clearly notes the below law USC 3123.

Disclosing any wiretaps, requests for records, ect is illegal.

(d) Nondisclosure of Existence of Pen Register or a Trap and Trace Device.— An order authorizing or approving the installation and use of a pen register or a trap and trace device shall direct that—
(1) the order be sealed until otherwise ordered by the court; and
(2) the person owning or leasing the line or other facility to which the pen register or a trap and trace device is attached or applied, or who is obligated by the order to provide assistance to the applicant, not disclose the existence of the pen register or trap and trace device or the existence of the investigation to the listed subscriber, or to any other person, unless or until otherwise ordered by the court.

»www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/text/18/3123

StuartMW
Who Is John Galt?
Premium
join:2000-08-06
Galt's Gulch
kudos:2

1 edit

Their motto is...

The gummints motto is

All your bases data are belong to us!

In the name of

• Protecting the children.

• Protecting us from terrorists.

that fact is not going to change.

PS: As a corollary anyone that doesn't hand over data the gummint wants is either a terrorist supporter or hates children.
--
Don't feed trolls--it only makes them grow!

skeechan
Ai Otsukaholic
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Re: Their motto is...

»www.youtube.com/watch?v=QgJljf6BK88


F the Children
--
Nocchi rules.

StuartMW
Who Is John Galt?
Premium
join:2000-08-06
Galt's Gulch
kudos:2

Re: Their motto is...

said by skeechan:

F the Children

If they're under 18 you go to jail for that
--
Don't feed trolls--it only makes them grow!
josephf

join:2009-04-26

LOL, Which Carrier Is Better? AT&T?

Is AT&T where all Verizon customers will run to, to avoid this scenario?

AT&T are the folks that let the NSA install snoops in their switch rooms.

You can run but you can't hide. All the carriers do this.
rahvin112

join:2002-05-24
Sandy, UT

Re: LOL, Which Carrier Is Better? AT&T?

All the telco's installed direct connections to their core routers. What do you think the data center in Utah is for? You aren't safe with any of them unless you are using your own encryption system built by your own hands.
openbox9
Premium
join:2004-01-26
Germany
kudos:2

Re: LOL, Which Carrier Is Better? AT&T?

Or you come to terms with the fact that privacy simply doesn't exist in a world electronic communications and the Internet.
Mr Matt

join:2008-01-29
Eustis, FL
kudos:1

Technology is the enemy of privacy!

Advances in technology have made the abuses of citizens privacy rights too easy. We need some new lawmakers to replace the spineless ones that will push back on these abuses. Remember technology is enemy of privacy!

KrK
Heavy Artillery For The Little Guy
Premium
join:2000-01-17
Tulsa, OK

Re: Technology is the enemy of privacy!

No, people are the problem. Not Technology. It is merely the tool that people wield.
elray

join:2000-12-16
Santa Monica, CA
Reviews:
·Time Warner Cable
·EarthLink

What do you expect?

The government will get what it wants, by any means necessary, without regards to whether or not they have the right.

Carriers aren't going to slow them down and create headaches for themselves. You can't expect them to resist - there is no point.

The problem is with an administration that chooses to ignore our Constitutional protections at every turn.

Jodokast96
Stupid people really piss me off.
Premium
join:2005-11-23
Erial, NJ
kudos:2
Reviews:
·Verizon Online DSL

Re: What do you expect?

said by elray:

The government will get what it wants, by any means necessary, without regards to whether or not they have the right.

Carriers aren't going to slow them down and create headaches for themselves. You can't expect them to resist - there is no point.

The problem is with an administration that chooses to ignore our Constitutional protections at every turn.

Your right. If the carriers refuse, they just hire the Chinese to hack the info.
Chawk12
Premium
join:2011-12-26
Everett, WA

I've been in the communications industry for 35 years.

Part of that time I was a Verizon employee. That company has handed over warrant less phone info since 9/11.

It used to be phone records and conversations were considered private and government had to have a court order to get it.

jack b
Gone Fishing
Premium,MVM
join:2000-09-08
Cape Cod
kudos:1

Improper...

The gov't is spinning their story, more or less admitting the data request may have been "improper".

Improper is when you eat your dinner with your dessert fork.

What they did is criminal.
--
~Help Find a Cure for Cancer~
~Proud Member of Team Discovery ~
elray

join:2000-12-16
Santa Monica, CA
Reviews:
·Time Warner Cable
·EarthLink

1 recommendation

The silver lining

While no one should be subject to this type of fishing expedition, in my opinion, it couldn't happen to a more deserving lot. Maybe, with a taste of their own medicine, the AP might wake up and start actually questioning policy rather than acting as cheerleaders.

Squire James

@embarqhsd.net

Government Snooping

At one time I dismissed George Orwell's "1984" because I didn't believe government spying could ever get that competent. Recent events are changing my mind on that issue.

This recent trend toward totalitarianism, whether perpetrated or perpetuated by the right or left, is not good for either. Sometimes the people in power forget that the weapon they wield may someday be used against them (e.g. that "budget reconciliation" procedure instituted when the Republicans were in charge really came back to bite them when it was applied to Obamacare).