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Wi-Fi Alliance Unveils 802.11ac Certification Program
Aims to Ensure Interoperability of 802.11ac Devices
by Karl Bode 06:31PM Thursday Jun 20 2013 Tipped by FFH See Profile
The Wi-Fi Alliance has launched its Wi-Fi Certified ac certification program, which should help improve interoperability between 802.11ac devices. "CERTIFIED ac advances the ability of Wi-Fi to satisfy that appetite by increasing capacity and improving performance, thus paving the way for new products and services that provide a great user experience," the group stated in a press release. Late last year executives from gearmakers admitted that initial versions of 802.11ac may not be worth it for users, but that later incarnations of hardware will prove to be significantly better. First-generation 802.11ac products offer up to 1.3 Gbps via three spatial streams and 80-MHz-wide channels -- double the largest 40 MHz channel width currently seen in 802.11n hardware.

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brianiscool

join:2000-08-16
Tampa, FL
kudos:1

1 recommendation

Nice

When I get download and uploads at 1GB speeds via wireless let me know. You will be lucky to get 600Mbps - 700Mbps.

tshirt
Premium,MVM
join:2004-07-11
Snohomish, WA
kudos:4

1 recommendation

Re: Nice

Considering IEEE 802.11g specification that extended throughput to up to 54 Mbit/s is only 10 years old .6 to 1.3Gbps is amazing.

FFH
Premium
join:2002-03-03
Tavistock NJ
kudos:5
I have a Trendnet AC router and my Samsung Galaxy S4 supports 11ac protocol. And I have seen 500mbps speeds between router and smartphone. The good thing though is I get full Comcast Blast speeds of about 60/14 Mbps to my smartphone. Speeds I couldn't get using 802.11n 5ghz old router.
--
"If you want to anger a conservative lie to him.
If you want to anger a liberal tell him the truth."

88615298
Premium
join:2004-07-28
West Tenness

Re: Nice

said by FFH:

I have a Trendnet AC router and my Samsung Galaxy S4 supports 11ac protocol. And I have seen 500mbps speeds between router and smartphone.

doubtful

in practice you're not likely to see an 802.11ac reach its theoretical maximum of 1.3 Gigabit per second (Gbps). That's because the conditions you need to reach that speed requires a laboratory instead your office.

To reach the highest speeds you need three data-streams, each of which can run up to 433 Megabits per second (Mbps). A typical 802.11ac access point can support up to eight data streams. Client devices must only support one.

For example, the Samsung Galaxy S4 supports 802.11ac with the Broadcom BCM4335 Wi-Fi chipset. This chipset only supports a single stream so, even in the best of all possible worlds, you'll only see 433Mbps.

Boricua
Premium
join:2002-01-26
Sacramuerto
I would like to see when the broadband providers start giving us these devices. Right now, I have U-Verse with a 2Wire gateway/modem still at .11g. I have yet to see them move up to .11n.
--
Illegal aliens have always been a problem in the United States. Ask any Indian. Robert Orben

BimmerE38FN

join:2002-09-15
Boise, ID
kudos:1

Re: No Mention of this

Why not just ad an AC AP to the modem/router?
34764170

join:2007-09-06
Etobicoke, ON

Re: No Mention of this

said by BimmerE38FN:

Why not just ad an AC AP to the modem/router?

Ya, doesn't make sense. The routers/"gateways" the ISPs hand out are for the most part garbage for wireless never mind the route too.
floydb1982

join:2004-08-25
Kent, WA
Reviews:
·Clearwire Wireless
I've had the Linksys WRT54G for the longest because I didn't have any need to upgrade to 802.11n because internet was only 25Mbps. Then when Comcast was going to be doubling there speeds at no extra cost only then did I upgrade to the new wireless 802.11n 40MHz 5GHz 450Mbps standard. My computer uses the 1GBps LAN, Mamas computer uses 802.11n 40MHz 5GHz 300Mbps, the Netgear NTV300 in the living room uses 802.11n 20MHz 150Mbps, and the Roku 2 XS in my bedroom uses 100Mbps LAN. We haven't had wireless 802.11n for that long and already the Wi-Fi alliance want to go to 802.11ac. I mean come on now folks this is completely crazy. I'm not upgraded. Then there was the problems of people getting burned buying pre-wireless 802.11n devices that got rendered junk because they had no compatibly with the final draft version of 802.11n.
av9116

join:2001-12-17
South San Francisco, CA

Re: Nice

said by floydb1982:

We haven't had wireless 802.11n for that long...

Technology won't be stagnant just because you were late in the game. By the time you're ready to jump on AC, it would be a mature product. The cycle will repeat with AD.
34764170

join:2007-09-06
Etobicoke, ON
said by floydb1982:

We haven't had wireless 802.11n for that long and already the Wi-Fi alliance want to go to 802.11ac. I mean come on now folks this is completely crazy. I'm not upgraded.

11n has been around long enough and it is past due that there be faster wireless standards. People keep talking about how wireless is going to replace wired but it sure as hell won't at the slow pace and poor job they've done with the standards so far.

That's your problem for being behind the times.
Secyurityet
Premium
join:2012-01-07
untied state

There goes the neighborhood...

Can't wait to see what that does to the existing channel structure!

FFH
Premium
join:2002-03-03
Tavistock NJ
kudos:5

Re: There goes the neighborhood...

said by Secyurityet:

Can't wait to see what that does to the existing channel structure!

It could be a problem eventually. But all APs within scanning distance of my home are still on 2.4 ghz. I was the only one on 802.11n 5 ghz and am now the only one on 802.11ac 5ghz.
--
"If you want to anger a conservative lie to him.
If you want to anger a liberal tell him the truth."

DataRiker
Premium
join:2002-05-19
00000

Re: There goes the neighborhood...

More than likely the AP's are dual 2.4/5.0, just the distance 5.0 can travel is much shorter.

Steve Mehs
Gun Control Is Using A Steady Hand
Premium
join:2005-07-16
kudos:1

Re: There goes the neighborhood...

The 802.11AD protocol will provide support for 2.4 GHz (as well as 60 GHz and 5 GHz) and will be the successor to AC.

My last day working at Worst Buy I wanted so bad to buy the Linksys EA 6500 AC router that lists for $200, it was $120 w/employee discount, but held off because in about a year Wireless AD will be here and I'd upgrade anyway. So for now I'll keep the 4500 N Router and upgrade to AD next year.

With having three bands, I'll have to come up with a new SSID. My 2.4 GHz Network is NSA Surveillance, my 5.0 GHz Network is CIA Surveillance, the mobile hotspot on one phone is FBI Surveillance and the other phone is DHS Surveillance. Maybe I could call the 60 GHz 'US Secret Service'? Help me, I'm running out of government agencies here!
--
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Message to Anti-Gun Liberals: HA HA!
Hussein Obama 0 – American Public 1
“the right of the people to keep and bear arms shall not be infringed”
Repeal Obamacare Now!

Guspaz
Guspaz
Premium,MVM
join:2001-11-05
Montreal, QC
kudos:23

Re: There goes the neighborhood...

It'll be a year before any 802.11ad products hit the market, and probably another year beyond that before there are enough products to make it usable (having an access point is useless if none of your devices can talk to it). 60 GHz will also be extremely low range. Line-of-site, it won't pass through walls (and possibly not through obstacles), so it will be of pretty limited use; only works in the same room as the router. It's not clear (to me, anyhow) how much faster 802.11ad will be than 802.11ac in the 5 GHz band.
--
Latest version of CapSavvy systray usage checker: »CapSavvy v4.2 released!
mgamer20o0

join:2003-12-01
Norwalk, CA
said by Steve Mehs:

The 802.11AD protocol will provide support for 2.4 GHz (as well as 60 GHz and 5 GHz) and will be the successor to AC.

My last day working at Worst Buy I wanted so bad to buy the Linksys EA 6500 AC router that lists for $200, it was $120 w/employee discount, but held off because in about a year Wireless AD will be here and I'd upgrade anyway. So for now I'll keep the 4500 N Router and upgrade to AD next year.

With having three bands, I'll have to come up with a new SSID. My 2.4 GHz Network is NSA Surveillance, my 5.0 GHz Network is CIA Surveillance, the mobile hotspot on one phone is FBI Surveillance and the other phone is DHS Surveillance. Maybe I could call the 60 GHz 'US Secret Service'? Help me, I'm running out of government agencies here!

ATF DEA ICE HLS EPA IRS we will always have more agencies to use then bands....

Juggernaut
Irreverent or irrelevant?
Premium
join:2006-09-05
Kelowna, BC
kudos:2
I'm the only one on a 5gHz connection in the neighbourhood as well (for now). Love it.

That said, I'll keep ahead of the rest of the herd later when ac/ad comes along. A solitary signal is a thing of joy.
--
"I fear the day that technology will surpass our human interaction. The world will have a generation of idiots." ~ Albert Einstein

Steve Mehs
Gun Control Is Using A Steady Hand
Premium
join:2005-07-16
kudos:1

Re: There goes the neighborhood...

That's why I love living where I do. I’m in a rural enough area only to be able to physically see one other house no matter where I am on my property and pick up exactly zero wireless signals besides my own, but not rural enough to have access to 50Mb cable.

Country air, cows mooing, no neighbors and cable, can't beat it!

Juggernaut
Irreverent or irrelevant?
Premium
join:2006-09-05
Kelowna, BC
kudos:2

Re: There goes the neighborhood...

Hell yeah, good deal.

88615298
Premium
join:2004-07-28
West Tenness
said by Secyurityet:

Can't wait to see what that does to the existing channel structure!

Yep. I like to se the trick of getting a 80 MHz channel over 2.4 GHz when the wi-fi band there is only 72 MHz wide. Unless it only has range of 15 feet I can see huge interference issues. Time to start investing in some wi-fi blocking paint
Kamus

join:2011-01-27
El Paso, TX

4 antennas

Bring on the MU-MIMO routers. This is one of the most important features in the new standard. Hopefully we'll get it soon.
mingkee27

join:2013-06-21
Brooklyn, NY

no plan to upgrade at this moment

It is pretty costly to upgrade the infrastructure in the house (one wireless router and 4 APs) as there's no client supporting AC at this moment.
There's no specific benefit to go for such performance except running Gigabit fiber as backbone for the house.
Adding more security and IPsec VPN support are much more important as N is more than good enough.
Kamus

join:2011-01-27
El Paso, TX

Re: no plan to upgrade at this moment

said by mingkee27:

Adding more security and IPsec VPN support are much more important as N is more than good enough.

Different strokes for different folks. Some people have use for the added bandwidth already. and besides, VPN support is not something that has anything to do with the standard, it's not like it's a mutually exclusive thing.

For households that have multiple clients, the added bandwidth is already very welcome. remember: this is total capacity, and it goes down pretty fast with enough clients. I know that before i had 5ghz clients my network couldn't keep up with my multi-room streaming needs. Now that i'm adding 5ghz clients (n clients, but still) multi-room streaming is much more consistent.
34764170

join:2007-09-06
Etobicoke, ON
said by mingkee27:

There's no specific benefit to go for such performance except running Gigabit fiber as backbone for the house.
Adding more security and IPsec VPN support are much more important as N is more than good enough.

Gigabit Ethernet is really old news... but Wifi is still behind for performance. The unfortunate reality is that an overwhelming majority of 11n devices on the market are 2.4GHz only and although it is an improvement over 11g its still is far from decent levels of performance. 11ac is very much necessary in order to usher in good Wifi performance and range.

More security and IPsec has nothing to do with Wifi.